Follow us on Facebook or  Youtube   In God We Trust   -   Established 2008   -   (606) 638-0123   -   Contact Us   -   Best if viewed in Chrome Browser or IE9




















2nd_logo_copy_JJJ

lycom_front_page_center   trmc-asge
Please click on The Lazer ads to see the sponsors website and/or message.

TheLevisaLazer.com - Regional News

Cordle opens benefit show with historical "Pud Marcum" song; concert raises money for brother's loss despite delay...

Local talent, Zack Wright sits in with band on the banjoLocal talent, Zack Wright sits in with band on the banjo

By Catrina Vargo

Louisa, KY -- Despite a major sound system problem that delayed the show, Lawrence County's favorite son and famous bluegrass musician, singer and songwriter, Larry Cordle performed along with bands Hammertowne and Turning Ground, Saturday evening April 12, at the Lawrence County Community Center in Louisa, KY.  

The show was scheduled to start at 6pm, but due to sound equipment problems, didn't get underway until after 7pm.  Once the show got started, however, concert goers were clapping hands and tapping toes to the tunes that bluegrass fans love so well.

Janie Cordle, Rachel Reeder (granddaughter), Mike Cordle, and Larry CordleJanie Cordle, Rachel Reeder (granddaughter), Mike Cordle, and Larry CordleThe concert was a benefit show, raising money for Cordle's brother and sister-in-law, Mike and Janie Cordle, who lost everything recently in a house fire.  The show began with the band 'Turning Ground' based out of Salyersville, KY, who said they were happy to help out.

One member said he knew how Mike felt, as his house was hit by the 2012 tornado that ravaged Salyersville.

Hammertowne, the next band to take the stage, also commented on being glad that they could help the Cordles during their time of need.  Lead singer, David Carroll, said "If you can't help your neighbor when they need help, what good are ya?" 

The main attraction, Larry Cordle, thanked everyone for attending and for being so patient during the delay. "It really means a lot that you all came out to support Mike and his family" he said. 

Cordle began his show with the song 'Pud Marcum's Hanging,' the 1887 historical account about the last man hanged in Lawrence County.  Other favorite Cordle tunes included 'Black Diamond Strings,' 'Brown Check,' and 'You Can't Do Wrong and Get By,' among many others.

HammertowneHammertowneA couple highlights of the show were two young locals who showed their talent on stage with Cordle. 

Zack Wright played the banjo with the band in a rendition of the famous tune, 'Foggy Mountain Breakdown.' Dreydon Gordon joined in playing the spoons, and also entertained the crowd by tapping out some hoedown moves.

Concessions were available during the show, and all proceeds will go toward aiding Mike and Janie Cordle to recover from their loss.  Janie Cordle said "I am so pleased with how many people come out.  We thank everyone."

(See video on main page of Lazer)

'County seat' has new meaning;

Governor's Mansion gets 120 new chairs hand made by Berea College students


By Catrina Vargo

Here is Lawrence County's chair now being used in Governor's mansion. Lazer photo by Catrina VargoHere is Lawrence County's chair now being used in Governor's mansion. Lazer photo by Catrina VargoFrankfort, KY -- This year, the Kentucky Governor's  Mansion is 100 years old, and as part of the Centennial Celebration, First Lady, Jane Beshear, wanted to do something historical that the whole state could participate in.

According to the First Lady, the chairs that were used for large scale events at the mansion were in poor condition, unsafe for guests and in desperate need of being replaced, so she, along with the Kentucky Executive Mansion Foundation, decided to implement the County Seats Legacy Project.  

The project, appropriately named, would replace the old chairs with 120 new chairs or 'seats,' one to represent each county in the Commonwealth.  Due to a tight budget, the foundation got creative and asked each county to donate $1,000 toward each chair.  Any business, organization, or individual could participate by donating any amount to the project, thereby promoting themselves as well as contributing to a historical state project.

Representing Lawrence County were County Judge Executive, John Osborne, Louisa Rotary Club Treasurer and Kentucky Farm Bureau Board Member, Joe Hart, and Rambling Fever Travel Owner, and Levisa Lazer Reporter, Catrina VargoRepresenting Lawrence County were County Judge Executive, John Osborne, Louisa Rotary Club Treasurer and Kentucky Farm Bureau Board Member, Joe Hart, and Rambling Fever Travel Owner, and Levisa Lazer Reporter, Catrina VargoA true 'county seat legacy' it is, as the chairs were made by Berea College students, of wood that came from the Daniel Boone National Forest, with money donated by the people from each of the 120 counties in Kentucky.

Everyone who donated to the project was invited to a reception at the Governor's Mansion, Thursday, April 3, where the chairs were unveiled and a presentation given.  Each chair has a plaque on the back with the county name, and as guests began to arrive Thursday, all were looking among the chairs, searching for their 'county seat.'

Governor Beshear welcomed everyone, then introduced the First Lady who thanked all those in attendance for attending and contributing to the County Seats Legacy Project.  

"We wanted something that would be permanent and prominent, promoting Kentucky" said the First Lady.  

120 chairs or 'county seats' representing each Kentucky county120 chairs or 'county seats' representing each Kentucky countySo, they contacted Berea College which is well known for its craft and carpentry department to construct the chairs.  

"We were happy to be part of this project,” said Tim Glotzbach, Director of the Student Craft Program at Berea. The chairs are hand made from sustainable maple wood from the Daniel Boone National Forest. It was a labor of love from beginning to end" he said.  

“The students who crafted the chairs were all present at the ceremony Thursday, and recognized for their accomplishment. Glotzbach said the County Seats Project has been a great learning experience for the students.  

"Not only were they able to work with their hands, but they also learned about team effort, working with businesses, interacting with different people, as well as understanding Kentucky history."

Berea College President, Dr. Lyle Roelofs, invited everyone to come and visit Berea College, one of the few work colleges in the state.  

The meal served for the ceremony was spendid as Lawrence Countian Joe Hart (next to flower) is about to partake. Lazer photo by Catrina Vargo.The meal served for the ceremony was spendid as Lawrence Countian Joe Hart (next to flower) is about to partake. Lazer photo by Catrina Vargo."We reserve 75% of our places for Appalachian students, most of whom are from Kentucky" he said.  Berea College accepts students who are academically talented but with limited financial resources. Students pay for their tuition by working on campus in a variety of jobs, enabling them to graduate with little or no debt.

"This is the most important project we have been involved in" said Glotzbach. "How fitting it is that we had this opportunity to construct 120 chairs during Berea's 120th year of it's woodcraft department."  

First Lady Jane Beshear spekks about the project to invitees.First Lady Jane Beshear spekks about the project to invitees.First Lady Beshear said this project could not have been completed without the donors of each county.  "All of you stepped up and made a donation to this project and you are now a part of history."  A plaque will be placed in the mansion with the names of all the donors so it will always be known who, from each county, contributed to this historical project.  She also thanked the sponsors of the Centennial Celebration, Toyota, who was represented by Rick Hussenburg, and Xerox, represented by Kim Sweesey.

After the presentation was over, those representing their counties had a professional photo taken with Governor and First Lady Beshear.  Guests then mingled throughout the mansion and enjoyed a smorgasbord of delectable food and drinks.

Representing Lawrence County were County Judge Executive, John Osborne, Louisa Rotary Club Treasurer and Kentucky Farm Bureau Board Member, Joe Hart, and Rambling Fever Travel Owner, and Levisa Lazer Reporter, Catrina Vargo.  

Lawrence County Tourism also contributed to the County Seats Legacy Project.


Lawrence Co. Judge/Executive John Osborne strikes a pensive pose in the mainsion. Lazer photo by Catrina Vargo.Lawrence Co. Judge/Executive John Osborne strikes a pensive pose in the mainsion. Lazer photo by Catrina Vargo.

Deadline to Register to Vote in May 20th Primary Election is April 21, 2014;

Click Here

Register online by clicking above

Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes reminds eligible Kentuckians that the deadline to register to vote in the upcoming May 20 Primary Election is Monday, April 21.

County clerks’ offices throughout Kentucky will accept voter registration cards until the close of business on that date. Mail-in voter registration applications must be postmarked by April 21.

Grimes also reminds Kentuckians of several important voting laws:


To be eligible to vote, you must:

o Be a U.S. citizen,
o Be a Kentucky resident for at least 28 days before Election day,
o Be at least 18 years old by the date of the next general election,

o Not be a convicted felon, or if convicted of a felony offense, must have obtained a restoration of civil rights, 
o Not have been adjudged “mentally incompetent,” and

o Not claim the right to vote anywhere outside Kentucky.

• Minors who are 17 years old but will be 18 years old on or before the General Election on November 4, 2014, are eligible to register and vote in the upcoming Primary; however, they are not eligible to vote in special elections until they are 18 years old.

• Voters who have recently moved need to update their voter registration information by no later than April 21, 2014. Pursuant to KRS 116.025(6), individuals who move from one county to another county while the voter registration books are open and fail to update their registration information before the voter registration books close are not permitted to vote in the Primary.

• Changes in party affiliation for the 2014 Primary Election were due by December 31, 2013. Voters who changed their party affiliation after that date are not eligible to vote in partisan races in the Primary, although they may vote on nonpartisan races on the May Primary ballot. Voters who changed their party affiliation after December 31, 2013, may still vote for their candidate(s) of choice in the November General Election.

• Under the Secretary of State’s recently established Address Confidentiality Program, victims of domestic violence and sexual assault can register and update their registration while keeping their names and addresses out of publicly available voter records.

“The future of Kentucky and our nation depend on all eligible voters participating in the process,” said Grimes. “Registering to vote is the first step in being a part of the 2014 elections, and I hope that as many Kentuckians as are able will make their voices heard.”

You can check your current registration status on the Voter Information Center, https://cdcbp.ky.gov/VICWeb/index.jsp. To obtain a registration card or for more information about registering to vote, visit www.elect.ky.gov or contact your county clerk or the State Board of Elections at (502) 573-7100. To learn more about the Address Confidentiality Program, visit www.sos.ky.gov.

More Articles...

Page 1 of 304

Start
Prev
1

Lazer Sponsor

kirk1