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TheLevisaLazer.com - Health

Date: 08-12-2014;

Lexington Board of Health explores regulating e-cigarettes;

The Lexington-Fayette County Board of Health is exploring restricting the use of electronic cigarettes in public spaces and how to best educate the public about their dangers.

Describing tobacco companies as "evil," Board Chairman Scott White said there is more news every day about the problems with e-cigarettes. Most of America's big tobacco companies have purchased e-cigarette companies, which are sometimes touted in advertisements as a safer alternative to traditional cigarettes.

White, an attorney who has faced Big Tobacco in the courtroom, noted many of the flavors of e-cigarettes, like bubble gum, are targeted at children. "If marketing a deadly product to children isn't evil I don't know what is," said White, who helped lead the state's effort to sue the tobacco companies in the late 1990s.

"We have enough history with the tobacco industry to know we need to get ahead of this," said White, during a meeting of the board Monday.

The exact steps the board of health will take need to be determined. But White said, "everything is on the table".

Options including amending Lexington's current smoking ban to include e-cigarettes and creating a public education campaign.

White also said he planned to send a letter to Superintendent Tom Shelton asking the Fayette County Public School system to join the board in fighting the spread of e-cigarettes.

Ellen Hahn, director of Kentucky Center for Smoke-Free Policy at the University of Kentucky, said five other Kentucky communities restrict e-cigarettes as part of their smoke-free ordinances: Bardstown, Glasgow, Manchester, Danville and Madison County.

Hahn said it's now considered a "best practice" to include electronic cigarettes in smoke-free laws because they are a tobacco product and they pollute the air. E-cigarettes give off tiny particles that can lodge in the lungs and cause disease, she said.

When Lexington passed its ban in 2003, e-cigarettes had not yet been introduced in the United States.

Dr. Stephanie Mayfield, Kentucky's commissioner of public health, told the board the state has a goal of reducing overall smoking by 10 percent.

Public health departments in the state are helping to reduce smoking rates in Kentucky. Mayfield said the rates remain high with about 29 percent of adults smoking and approximately 18 percent people younger than 18.

The state has also reported a leap in nicotine poisonings and that leap has been tied to e-cigarettes.

In April Gov. Steve Beshear signed a law banning the sale of e-cigarettes to minors.

By Mary Meehan
Lexington Herald-Leader

 

“AUGUST IS NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION AWARENESS MONTH”

Send Your Kids Back to School with their Vaccines Up to Date...

National Immunization Awareness Month is a reminder that we all need vaccines throughout our lives.

Back-to-school season is here. It’s time for parents to gather supplies and back packs. It’s also the perfect time to make sure your kids are up to date on their vaccines.

To celebrate the importance of immunizations throughout life – and make sure children are protected with all the vaccines they need – the Lawrence County Health Department is joining with partners nationwide in recognizing August as National Immunization Awareness Month.

“Getting children all of the vaccines recommended by CDC’s immunization schedule is one of the most important things parents can do to protect their children’s health – and that of classmates and the community,” said Health Department Director Debbie Miller. “If you haven’t done so already, now is the time to check with your doctor to find out what vaccines your child needs.”

Most schools require children to be current on vaccinations before enrolling to protect the health of all students.

Today’s childhood vaccines protect against serious and potentially life-threatening diseases, including polio, measles, and whooping cough.

When children are not vaccinated, they are at increased risk and can spread diseases to others in their classrooms and community – including babies who are too young to be fully vaccinated, and people with weakened immune systems due to cancer or other health conditions.

School-age children need vaccines. For example, children who are 4 to 6 years old are due for boosters of four vaccines: DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis), chickenpox, MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) and polio. Older children, like preteens and teens, need Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis), MenACWY (meningococcal conjugate vaccine) and HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccines when they are 11 to 12. In addition, yearly flu vaccines are recommended for all children 6 months and older.

Parents can find out more about the recommended immunization schedule at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/index.html or at the Lawrence County Health Department, telephone 606-638-4389.

A Healthy Start: Reasons to Vaccinate Your Child

 

National Immunization Awareness Month is a reminder that we all need

vaccines right from the start and throughout our lives.

Immunization gives parents the safe, proven power to protect their children from 14 serious and sometimes deadly diseases before they turn 2 years old.

To celebrate the importance of immunizations for a healthy start and throughout our lives – and to make sure children are protected with all the vaccines they need –the Lawrence County Health Department is joining with partners nationwide in recognizing August as National Immunization Awareness Month. The week of August 3 - August 9 will focus specifically on babies from birth through age 2.

“Children who don’t receive recommended vaccines are at risk of getting the disease or illness, and of having a severe case,” said Health Department Director Debbie Miller. “Every dose of every vaccine is important to protect your child and others in the community from infectious diseases. Talk to your doctor or other health care professional to make sure your child is up to date on all the vaccines he or she needs.”

Today’s childhood vaccines protect against serious and potentially life-threatening diseases, including polio, measles, whooping cough and chickenpox.

There are many important reasons to make sure your child is vaccinated:

• Immunizations can protect your child from 14 serious diseases.

• Vaccination is very safe and effective.

• Immunizations can protect others you care about.

• Immunization can save your family time and money.

• Immunization protects future generations.

When children are not vaccinated, they are at increased risk and can spread diseases to others in their family and community – including babies who are too young to be fully vaccinated, and people with weakened immune systems due to cancer and other health conditions.

Parents can find out more about the recommended immunization schedule at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/index.html or by calling the Lawrence County Health Department at 606-638-4389.

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