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Date: June 2, 2017

Contact: April Stauffer, Community Outreach Coordinator

(859-266-5283, Ext. 8179).


UK Telehealth: Management of Behavioral Symptoms in Dementia

Join us for an educational session that provides valuable information about medical management and social/behavioral strategies to manage challenging behaviors among individuals with dementia.  Bring your questions for an engaging session.  This program is offered through an interactive telemedicine system to connect with persons who are impacted by Alzheimer’s and related memory disorders, providing education and supportive services across the state of Kentucky.  This event is FREE and open to the public. Registration is required.  Contact Hardin Stevens at the UK Sanders Brown Center on Aging at 859-323-2997 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to register. Deadline to register is July 20th.

Date: July 27, 2017

Location:     Center for Health Education and Research, Room 102-EFG

316 West 2nd St.

Morehead, KY 40351

Time:    6:30-8pm EST

Contact Kristi Helton for directions at 606-783-6479.

Date: June 2, 2017

Contact: April Stauffer, Community Outreach Coordinator

(859-266-5283, Ext. 8179).


UK Telehealth: Management of Behavioral Symptoms in Dementia

Join us for an educational session that provides valuable information about medical management and social/behavioral strategies to manage challenging behaviors among individuals with dementia.  Bring your questions for an engaging session. 

This program is offered through an interactive telemedicine system to connect with persons who are impacted by Alzheimer’s and related memory disorders, providing education and supportive services across the state of Kentucky.  This event is FREE and open to the public. Registration is required.  Contact Hardin Stevens at the UK Sanders Brown Center on Aging at 859-323-2997 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to register. Deadline to register is July 20th.

Date: July 27, 2017

Location:     Center for Health Education and Research, Room 102-EFG

316 West 2nd St.

Morehead, KY 40351

Time:    6:30-8pm EST

Contact Kristi Helton for directions at 606-783-6479.

Congrats Gary Lyons on 35 years... WOW!Congrats Gary Lyons on 35 years... WOW!

Congratulations to Gary Lyons for 35 years with TRMC Physical Therapy and Rehab!!! ...Wow what a milestone!!!

--Greg Kiser, CEO

 

May 9th, 2017 

As part of the 52 Weeks of Public Health campaign, the Kentucky Department for Public Health (DPH), within the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS), is promoting the impact of oral health on communities across the state.

“Lawrence County Health Department recognizes the importance of dental care,” Director Debbie Miller said. “We were so fortunate that the Kentucky Department for Public Health funded our Smile Savers Dental Hygiene Program in 2014 so that we are able to provide preventive services for Lawrence County students.”

DPH currently is working to update its Strategic Oral Health Plan for the first time in over a decade. As part of this work, the DPH Oral Health Program will gather stakeholders and other interested parties on May 31 and June 1 at the Downtown Lexington Hilton to assist in updating the plan to reflect new ideas and opportunities that will result in the improvement of oral health for all Kentuckians.

“The final product is one for everyone to use, not just government programs or dentists,” explained Julie Watts McKee, a dentist and Kentucky’s State Dental Director. “It is a handbook for anyone that is interested in healthier mouths. We hope that schools, universities, health plans and individuals will see something they can act on.”

“I will be attending the meeting in Lexington to update the Oral Health Strategic Plan,” Lawrence Co.’s Miller said today. “I am excited to collaborate with others across the state - to share what we’ve been doing in Lawrence County as well as learn new ideas to further improve dental health for Lawrence County residents.”

With the help of a professional facilitator, the meeting’s attendees will decide what aspects of dental care and dental health should be priorities for Kentucky.

While invitations have been sent out to targeted groups, such as dentists, hygienists, educators and policy makers, the general public is strongly encouraged to participate in the event and the process. The success of the plan depends on the inclusion of the consumer of services that affect dental health.

Anyone interested in contributing to the update of the plan should register for the Stakeholder’s meeting by clicking here.

There is no cost to attend this event and some meals are included, but registration is mandatory in order to plan for the attendees. The Kentucky Oral Health Program has limited financial support for consumers and parents of minor children who would like to participate. If interested in learning more about this, please call Bill Bishop at (502) 564-2154, extension 4423.

Throughout the planned 52 Weeks of Public Health promotion, DPH will spotlight a specific public health issue. Additional information about the campaign is available on the DPH website and is posted on the CHFS Facebook page where Kentuckians are encouraged to like and share posts among their networks of friends.

From Cabinet for Health and Family Services Communications

 

Lawrence County Health Department is accepting applications for a Full Time Local Health Nurse II-HANDS

General Duties include:  This position serves under limited direction of the Director or other appropriate supervisor.  Responsibilities for this position include, but are not limited to; Perform advanced level functions with increasing independence in the Health Access Nurturing Development Services (HANDS) program providing Parent Visit Assessment/Survey with parents (prenatal and/or immediately after the birth) to determine appropriate level of support from the community.  May mentor program staff, which provides home visitation or parent visit assessments of eligible clients involving infant and toddlers from birth up to three (3) years of age.  Provide advanced assistance to the public or program and office staff in areas of expertise, may participate in on site visits, review and preparation of reports and records to ensure accountability and effectiveness.  Interpret and implement policies and procedures as directed and may participate or make recommendations for improvement of services.  Prepare program plans, policy manuals and other informational materials for distribution to staff, patients, clients and the general public to meet federal, state and agency compliance. Maintain a collaborative relationship and represent the department on inter-agency councils and committees and attends meetings or conferences relating to area of responsibility. May supervise program staff, if special requirements of 902 KAR 4:120 are met. May conduct home visits when necessary. 

Additional duties will include participation in specialized or program specific clinics providing nursing care and assessment to the client or employee orientation and training consistent with the Core Clinical Service Guide (CCSG), Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice.  Develop and implement a plan of care or conduct educational counseling and teaching for individual clients and families based on health risks.  Document services provided to the client.  Maintain confidentiality and privacy according to guidelines.  

Minimum Education, Training or Experience:  See special requirements.  One (1) year of Registered Nurse (RN) experience.

Substitution for Education, Training or Experience:  BSN or Masters Degree in Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Education or Public Health may substitute for one (1) year of experience.  

Special Requirements:  (Age, Licensure, Regulation, Etc.)  Must have RN license in Kentucky or compact state.

Starting Salary:  $17.98 - $22.66/hr negotiable with additional experience.  Grade 18

Applications may be obtained at the Lawrence County Health Department, 1080 Meadowbrook Lane, Louisa KY 41230 or http://chfs.ky.gov/dph/lhdapp.htm  

Completed application and transcript must be returned by close of business Thursday, June 8 to Lawrence County Health Department.

Resume will not substitute for completed application

Equal Opportunity Employer

Applicants and employees in this classification may be required to submit to a drug screening test and background check.

 

NIH discovery in mice could lead to new class of medications to fight mid-life obesity

Study shows that there is a genetic program driven by an overactive enzyme that promotes weight gain and loss of exercise capacity at mid-lifeStudy shows that there is a genetic program driven by an overactive enzyme that promotes weight gain and loss of exercise capacity at mid-life


A team of scientists led by researchers from the National Institutes of Health has identified an enzyme that could help in the continuous battle against mid-life obesity and fitness loss. The discovery in mice could upend current notions about why people gain weight as they age, and could one day lead to more effective weight-loss medications.

“Our society attributes the weight gain and lack of exercise at mid-life (approximately 30-60 years) primarily to poor lifestyle choices and lack of will power, but this study shows that there is a genetic program driven by an overactive enzyme that promotes weight gain and loss of exercise capacity at mid-life,” said lead study author Jay H. Chung, Ph.D., M.D., head of the Laboratory of Obesity and Aging Research at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of NIH.

Chung and his team used mice to test the potentially key role this enzyme plays in obesity and exercise capacity. They administered an inhibitor that blocked the enzyme in one group being fed high-fat foods, but withheld it in another. The result was a 40 percent decrease in weight gain in the group that received the inhibitor.

The study, the first to link the increased activity of this enzyme to aging and obesity, appears in the current issue of Cell Metabolism. Its findings could have ramifications for several chronic illnesses. With lower rates of obesity, the researchers say, rates of heart disease, diabetes, and other diseases that tend to increase with age, including cancer and Alzheimer’s disease, could fall as well.

Researchers have known for years that losing weight and maintaining the capacity to exercise tend to get harder beginning between ages 30 to 40 — the start of midlife. Scientists have developed new therapies for obesity, including fat-fighting pills. However, many of those therapies have failed because of a lack of understanding about the biological changes that cause middle-aged people to gain weight, particularly around their abdomen.

Chung, an endocrinologist, was always puzzled by the aging-weight gain paradox. An average adult in America gains 30 pounds from age 20 to 50, even though food intake usually decreases during this period. The aim of the current study was to better understand this mid-life weight gain and lowered exercise capacity.

Chung and his associates searched for biochemical changes that occurred in middle-aged animals (human equivalent of 45 years). They found that an enzyme called DNA-dependent protein kinase, or DNA-PK, increases in activity with age. Further work showed that DNA-PK promotes conversion of nutrients to fat and decreases the number of mitochondria, tiny organelles in the cells that turn fat into energy to fuel the body.

Mitochondria can be found in abundance among young people, but the numbers drop considerably in older people. Researchers know that decreased mitochondria can promote obesity as well as loss of exercise capacity.

Chung and his associates theorized that reducing DNA-PK activity may decrease fat accumulation and increase mitochondria number as well as promote fat burning. The researchers tested their theory by orally administering a drug that inhibits DNA-PK and found that, in addition to preventing weight gain in the mice, the inhibitor drug boosted mitochondrial content in skeletal muscle, increased aerobic fitness in obese and middle aged mice, and reduced the incidence of obesity and type-2 diabetes..

“Our studies indicate that DNA-PK is one of the drivers of the metabolic and fitness decline that occurs during aging, which makes staying lean and physically fit difficult and increases susceptibility to metabolic diseases like diabetes,” Chung said. “The identification of this new mechanism is very important for improving public health.”.

“The study opens the door to the development of a new type of weight-loss medication that could work by inhibiting DNA-PK activity,” Chung said. However, he notes that DNA-PK inhibitors have yet to be tested this way in humans.

In the meantime, the researchers say, middle-aged people who are fighting obesity should not abandon common practices of reducing calorie intake and boosting exercise, even if it takes a while to see results.

This study was supported by the Intramural Research Program of NHLBI, part of NIH.