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TheLevisaLazer.com - Health

HEALTH INSURANCE OPTIONS FOR KENTUCKY RESIDENTS

Open Enrollment starts November 15, 2014 thru February 15, 2015

Do you need help in looking at the options available?

Don’t know where to start or don’t have access to the internet?

WE CAN HELP

Northeast KY Community Action Agency is offering FREE assistance to anyone interested in reviewing the health insurance options available through the Kentucky Health Benefit Exchange.  No income limits apply to receive our assistance.  Call one of our local offices for an appointment.

Boyd               Raymond Graeves              606-225-7418

Carter             Charity Brown                     606-225-7419

Elliott              Dawnita Lewis                     606-225-7420

Greenup         Tammy Moore                    606-225-7421

Lawrence       Mary Roberts                       606-225-7422

 

This free service is available through:

Northeast Kentucky Community Action Agency

21039 W US 60

Olive Hill KY 41164

www.nkcaa.net 606-286-4443

Date: 11-13-2014;

State encourages pregnant women to get flu shots...

Kentucky Press News Service

FRANKFORT – Pregnancy can increase the risk for complications from influenza, such as pneumonia, making it even more important for expectant mothers to get a flu vaccination.

In fact, pregnant women are more likely to be hospitalized from complications of the flu than non-pregnant women of the same age. For this reason, as well as other health concerns, officials from the Kentucky Department for Public Health urge pregnant women to be immunized against the flu before the upcoming holidays and before onset of the peak flu season, which typically occurs in Kentucky in February or March.

"Pregnancy changes the mother’s immune system, as well as affecting her heart and lungs,” Dr. Stephanie Mayfield, commissioner of DPH, said in a state news release. “These changes may place pregnant women at increased risk for complications from the flu as well as hospitalizations and even death. Contracting the flu virus during pregnancy may also cause an increase in serious problems for their unborn baby, including premature labor and delivery.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend that women who are or become pregnant during the flu season should receive an inactivated flu vaccine. It can be given to pregnant women at any point during their pregnancy.

“Leading health officials agree that the flu vaccine is safe for pregnant women at all stages of pregnancy and for breastfeeding mothers,” Mayfield said. “The Kentucky Department for Public Health urges all pregnant women to get vaccinated against the flu.”

Immunizing the mother during pregnancy also has the added benefit of protecting her newborn. Immune antibodies are passed across the placenta before delivery, which could help to protect the infant during the first months after delivery, as the vaccine is not recommended for infants younger than six months of age. 

“Vaccinating pregnant women protects mothers, their unborn babies and their babies after birth,” Mayfield said in the news release. “Vaccination of the mother and all other household contacts before birth is the most effective measure to prevent flu infection in infants less than six months old.”

Infection with the flu virus can cause fever, headache, cough, sore throat, runny nose, sneezing and body aches. Flu is a very contagious disease caused by the influenza virus, which spreads from person to person through contact with infected nasal and oral secretions. While vaccine supplies are expected to be ample this season, DPH advises individuals to call ahead to check with their health care provider, local health department or pharmacy about the availability of flu vaccine.

 

Don’t Let a Stroke Surprise You

Recognize the signs; reduce your risk...

Louisa, KY -- A bad headache. Difficulty focusing. Confusion or fumbling to find words. It’s tempting to explain away troubling symptoms and chalk them up to fatigue, eye trouble, one too many cups of coffee. But these symptoms – particularly if they’re severe – may signal a stroke.

Stroke is the third leading cause of death, behind cancer and heart disease. A disease that affects the blood supply to the brain, stroke occurs when a blood vessel or artery is blocked by a blood clot or bursts. When this happens, the area of the brain that is supplied with oxygen and nutrients by this blood vessel is damaged. As a result, the body part or function controlled by this part of the brain doesn’t operate the right way.

Another frightening statistic: according to the National Stroke Association, people who have a stroke are four times as likely to have another stroke during their lifetime. Recurrent strokes carry an even higher risk of death and disability because the brain has previously been injured by the original stroke.

A stroke can change a person’s life forever. It can leave the victim with moderate to severe physical, mental or psychological disabilities. Depending on the area of the brain affected, a stroke victim may lose their memory, speech, balance, certain fine motor skills, control over certain muscles or movement of entire limbs – even paralysis of one side of the body. A person’s personality or behavior can be forever changed by a stroke. They may have difficulty reading, processing information or even eating.

About 87 percent of all strokes are ischemic strokes, where a blockage of a blood vessel that supplies blood to the brain occurs. The clot can form in the brain area, or in a blood vessel elsewhere in the body – the heart, chest area or neck – where it can break loose and travel to the brain. The remaining 13 percent are called hemorrhagic strokes – strokes caused by a weakened blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the surrounding brain tissue. A brain aneurysm refers to the bulging of the weakened blood vessel, which continues to weaken and, if not treated, breaks and bleeds into the brain.


If you suspect that someone is having a stroke, act quickly. A stroke is an emergency – and mere seconds can make an enormous difference in the outcome for a stroke survivor. Call 9-1-1 and try to recall the time that symptoms first appeared. If a stroke victim receives immediate medical assistance, a clot-busting drug can be administered by medical personnel within three hours of first symptoms which may reduce the likelihood of long-term disability resulting from a stroke. The quicker that medical care is received, the greater a stroke victim’s chances are of not only surviving a stroke, but minimizing its effects.

Learn to recognize stroke signs, and be prepared – to save a friend or loved one’s life, or your own.

available that may help reduce the long-term effects of stroke.

Three Rivers Medical Center has been awarded Joint Commission Top Performer distinction three years in a row.  The Emergency Department is an Accredited Chest Pain Center.  TRMC is a 90-bed, acute care facility.  It is accredited by The Joint Commission.  With over 80 medical staff members, TRMC offers cardiology, general surgery, nephrology, orthopedics, urology, gynecology, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, gastroenterology, podiatry, 24-hour emergency care, diagnostic radiation, rehabilitative services and mental health.

www.threeriversmedicalcenter.com

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