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TheLevisaLazer.com - Health

“AUGUST IS NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION AWARENESS MONTH”

Send Your Kids Back to School with their Vaccines Up to Date...

National Immunization Awareness Month is a reminder that we all need vaccines throughout our lives.

Back-to-school season is here. It’s time for parents to gather supplies and back packs. It’s also the perfect time to make sure your kids are up to date on their vaccines.

To celebrate the importance of immunizations throughout life – and make sure children are protected with all the vaccines they need – the Lawrence County Health Department is joining with partners nationwide in recognizing August as National Immunization Awareness Month.

“Getting children all of the vaccines recommended by CDC’s immunization schedule is one of the most important things parents can do to protect their children’s health – and that of classmates and the community,” said Health Department Director Debbie Miller. “If you haven’t done so already, now is the time to check with your doctor to find out what vaccines your child needs.”

Most schools require children to be current on vaccinations before enrolling to protect the health of all students.

Today’s childhood vaccines protect against serious and potentially life-threatening diseases, including polio, measles, and whooping cough.

When children are not vaccinated, they are at increased risk and can spread diseases to others in their classrooms and community – including babies who are too young to be fully vaccinated, and people with weakened immune systems due to cancer or other health conditions.

School-age children need vaccines. For example, children who are 4 to 6 years old are due for boosters of four vaccines: DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis), chickenpox, MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) and polio. Older children, like preteens and teens, need Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis), MenACWY (meningococcal conjugate vaccine) and HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccines when they are 11 to 12. In addition, yearly flu vaccines are recommended for all children 6 months and older.

Parents can find out more about the recommended immunization schedule at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/index.html or at the Lawrence County Health Department, telephone 606-638-4389.

A Healthy Start: Reasons to Vaccinate Your Child

 

National Immunization Awareness Month is a reminder that we all need

vaccines right from the start and throughout our lives.

Immunization gives parents the safe, proven power to protect their children from 14 serious and sometimes deadly diseases before they turn 2 years old.

To celebrate the importance of immunizations for a healthy start and throughout our lives – and to make sure children are protected with all the vaccines they need –the Lawrence County Health Department is joining with partners nationwide in recognizing August as National Immunization Awareness Month. The week of August 3 - August 9 will focus specifically on babies from birth through age 2.

“Children who don’t receive recommended vaccines are at risk of getting the disease or illness, and of having a severe case,” said Health Department Director Debbie Miller. “Every dose of every vaccine is important to protect your child and others in the community from infectious diseases. Talk to your doctor or other health care professional to make sure your child is up to date on all the vaccines he or she needs.”

Today’s childhood vaccines protect against serious and potentially life-threatening diseases, including polio, measles, whooping cough and chickenpox.

There are many important reasons to make sure your child is vaccinated:

• Immunizations can protect your child from 14 serious diseases.

• Vaccination is very safe and effective.

• Immunizations can protect others you care about.

• Immunization can save your family time and money.

• Immunization protects future generations.

When children are not vaccinated, they are at increased risk and can spread diseases to others in their family and community – including babies who are too young to be fully vaccinated, and people with weakened immune systems due to cancer and other health conditions.

Parents can find out more about the recommended immunization schedule at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/index.html or by calling the Lawrence County Health Department at 606-638-4389.

July 17, 2014;

Free colon cancer screening thru Lawrence County Health Dept. 2014-2016;

 

make_that_call_logomake_that_call_logoColon cancer screening saves lives. Yet despite the preventable nature of this disease, colon cancer is still the second leading cause of cancer death in Kentucky.  Over 2,600 cases of colon cancer are diagnosed in Kentucky each year, with more than half of those cases diagnosed at a late stage.

Tragic, because when detected early, the 5-year survival rate for colon cancer is more than 90%, and at least 60% of colon cancer deaths could be prevented altogether with regular screenings.

Kentucky Colon Cancer Screening Program (KCCSP)—a public/private partnership—will again be funding colon cancer screening during 2014-16 for eligible uninsured, low income, legal residents of KY (either citizens or legal immigrants) in fifteen (15) health departments throughout Kentucky.

 

Health department grants were awarded to:

 

Barren River District Health Department

Boyle County Health Department - NEW

Christian County Health Department

Fayette County Health Department

Floyd County Health Department

Jessamine County Health Department

Kentucky River District Health Department - NEW

Knox County Health Department - NEW

Lake Cumberland District Health Department

Laurel County Health Department - NEW

Lawrence County Health Department

Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness

Montgomery County Health Department - NEW

Purchase District Health Department - NEW

Wedco District Health Department - NEW

 

The Kentucky Cancer Program (part of the cancer control programs at University of Kentucky/Markey Cancer Center and University of Louisville/James Graham Brown Cancer Center) will be working with health departments to assist in educating the public about the importance of screening and the availability of the health departments’ colon cancer screening resources.

Men and women who are age 50+ (age 45+ for African Americans) or at high risk for colon cancer should be screened.

Thus far, more than 1212 Kentuckians have been screened through the KCCSP, with 8 cancers detected and 156 patients had polyps detected and removed before they turned into cancer.

KCCSP trained patient navigators will guide patients through the process of being screened for colon cancer, either with a FIT take home test, or a colonoscopy if a patient is at high risk or their FIT is positive.

The KCCSP has not only increased screening, but it’s affected the lives of many Kentuckians.  Visit http://www.coloncancerpreventionproject.org/component/content/article/142.html to learn more about the stories of Kentuckians impacted through this life-saving program.

For more information about colon cancer screening in Lawrence County and eligibility for the KCCSP program, call (638-9500).  Or, call the regional office of the Kentucky Cancer Program at (793-7006).

 

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