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As summer ends and fall approaches, we begin to hear a lot about the seasonal flu and the importance of getting vaccinated. Influenza, also known as “the flu,” is a contagious respiratory disease caused by the influenza virus, which affects the nose, throat and lungs. Every year in the United States more than 200,000 people are hospitalized because of the flu, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Several important steps can be taken to help prevent contracting and spreading the virus.

Individuals who are at high risk for developing flu-related complications should exercise particular caution during flu season. Children under age five, adults 65 and older, pregnant women, people with chronic medical conditions and people who live in nursing homes or long-term care facilities are especially susceptible to complications related to flu.

The best way to prevent getting the flu and spreading it to others is to get a vaccine. It’s best to get vaccinated as early as possible in the season as it takes about two weeks for antibodies to develop after vaccination. For the 2016-2017 seasons, the CDC recommends using an injectable influenza vaccine. Two types of injectable vaccines will be available this flu season:

Trivalent flu vaccine: A three-component vaccination injected into the muscle of the arm. There are several trivalent shots that are appropriate for people 18 and older. High-dose trivalent shots are recommended for people over 65.
Quadrivalent flu vaccine: A four-component vaccination approved for use in different age groups. The intradermal quadrivalent flu shot uses a smaller needle and is injected into the skin instead of the muscle.

Besides vaccination, there are several other things you can do to minimize the risk of catching the virus and spreading it to others. Most viruses spread through direct contact, so it is extremely important to wash your hands regularly in warm, soapy water and avoid contact with face, mouth and eyes. When sneezing, always use a clean tissue and discard used ones, and if a tissue is not available, sneeze away from others.


Using natural methods to help prevent to the flu can also be effective. Staying hydrated and drinking plenty of fluids can help flush out the body. Getting fresh air can also help keep the body hydrated, especially during the cold months when central heat tends to dry out the skin. Exercising regularly and eating a diet high in vegetables and fruits can help increase blood flow and stimulate the body’s natural virus-killing cells.

The seasonal flu virus changes every season, so it is important to stay current with your vaccinations each year. Practicing good cleanliness habits and healthy routines can also help keep you and your loved ones healthy throughout flu season and all year long.


 flu shots part 2flu shots part 2

Sept. 21, 2017

Dozen Ways You Can Recondition & Regain Healthy Beautiful Skin During Fall

Winston-Salem, NC – Offering a dozen Fall Skincare Tips, HorseOPeace.com goat milk soap founder Elizabeth Sanders says: “Autumn months offer a respite to adjust our skincare to recondition skin dried from hot summer and protect it from the harsh winter months ahead as you restore luster to regain skin’s natural quality.”

Elizabeth Sanders Founder HorseOPeace -- “Fall is a time to nurture our skin as cooling temperatures and breathtakingly colorful foliage remind us of the transition from warm to cold months and is also a vital time to reassess our skincare needs.”      Elizabeth, formerly in an Amish-like lifestyle, is a Mom of 4 homeschooled sons (2 to 6) and founder of  HorseOPeace.com.com natural goat milk soap company and a skincare expert quoted in various media including The New York Times about the America to natural homemade soaps and various TV news and talk shows such as NBC  Oklahoma City’s News, CBS Focus Atlanta, FOX’s Good Day Arkansas and ABC Tampa Morning Blend Show, among others.  She was recently featured in New York’s WAG Magazine..Elizabeth Sanders Founder HorseOPeace -- “Fall is a time to nurture our skin as cooling temperatures and breathtakingly colorful foliage remind us of the transition from warm to cold months and is also a vital time to reassess our skincare needs.” Elizabeth, formerly in an Amish-like lifestyle, is a Mom of 4 homeschooled sons (2 to 6) and founder of HorseOPeace.com.com natural goat milk soap company and a skincare expert quoted in various media including The New York Times about the America to natural homemade soaps and various TV news and talk shows such as NBC Oklahoma City’s News, CBS Focus Atlanta, FOX’s Good Day Arkansas and ABC Tampa Morning Blend Show, among others. She was recently featured in New York’s WAG Magazine..

Featured in The New York Times report about the trend to homemade natural soaps, Elizabeth said, “As seasons change, family skincare needs change too. A first step to healthy skin is to avoid chemicals and dyes in store soaps that are actually detergent bars stripped of vital glycerin to be used in high-priced lotions and contain toxins that irritate dry, sensitive skin and may worsen conditions such as eczema and psoriasis.”

Elizabeth, whose HorseOPeace soaps BeautyStat.com called “superior at shockingly affordable prices,” offered her Dozen Skincare Tips to restore lustrous skin during Fall, which runs September 22 through December 20:

*  Take short showers as water has a drying effect on skin, and towel dry without rubbing.

*  Drink at least 8 or 10 glasses of water daily.

*  Make smart diet choices to balance protein, carbohydrate and fat with healthy foods, fruits and vegetables.

*  Hydrate skin with toxin-free HorseOPeace.com goat milk soap rich in vitamin A, selenium and alpha hydroxyl acids that nourish and protect skin and are free of chemicals and dyes in so many brands.

*  Avoid chemical-laden store soaps and especially antibacterial soaps that lessen skin's acidity.

*  Hydrate skin with HorseOPeace’s luxurious yet family-friendly priced Shea Butter Cream.

*  Use sunscreen if outdoors between 10am and 2pm, as Fall sun is still strong and can dry your skin.

*  Set time each day to indulge yourself and enjoy pampering your skin to be lovely and healthy.

*  Sleep 8 hours and try to relax to lessen stress.

*  Gently exfoliate with HorseOPeace.com’s top selling goat milk soap, Oatmeal ‘n Honey.

*  For dry, sensitive skin and conditions such as eczema topically moisturize and exfoliate with HorseOPeace.com soaps, salves and creams as a basic preventive skincare management step.

*  Don’t smoke, as nicotine constricts vessels and flow of blood with vital oxygen and nutrients.

 

Happily married to IT-expert husband Nick, who designed her website and oversees marketing, Elizabeth is a homeschooling Mom of 4 sons (2 to 6). Before founding HorseOPeace.com she lived an Amish-lifestyle in bonnet and homemade dresses training horses in harsh Wisconsin winters that dried her skin, making her hands crack and bleed. When she realized her hobby making goat milk soap healed her hands and dry skin condition she turned her hobby to a business, HorseOPeace.com That lifestyle discouraged women from education and business, so nine years ago she left but kept her devout faith, hard work ethic and vow to use natural ingredients.

Based in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, HorseOPeace.com has customers across the USA and internationally. Elizabeth Sanders’ goat milk soaps are available at www.HorseOPeace.com, Facebook.com/HorseOPeace and Amazon. HorseOPeace customers often join her Soap of the Month Club and enjoy family and business updates at HorseOPeace.com/blog, Twitter.com/HorseOPeace and

Instagram.com/HorseOPeaceRanch. Media contact: Brian Dobson, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Sept. 26, 2017

While presenting at the Southeastern Employment & Training Association (SETA) Workforce Development Conference in Louisville, Tim Robinson, CEO of Addiction Recovery Care, says:

"If we invest in people struggling with addiction by treating their medical and clinical needs, training them to enter the workforce, and connecting them to meaningful employment, we will continue to turn the tide against this deadly epidemic of addiction."

Tim Robinson presenting at the Southeastern Employment & Training Association (SETA) Workforce Development Conference in LouisvilleTim Robinson presenting at the Southeastern Employment & Training Association (SETA) Workforce Development Conference in Louisville

 From Facebook post

 
 

Date: 09-21-2017

Opioid epidemic in Kentucky is 'a public health catastrophe,' experts tell lawmakers

FRANKFORT, Ky. — It wasn't until his second year of a residency in a prestigious anesthesiology program at Johns Hopkins University that Dr. Michael Sprintz's addiction caught up with him and he was kicked out of the program and into treatment.

"Everyone has a drug of choice," said Sprintz, who became sober and eventually completed his medical training. "For me it was everything."

But he warned Kentucky lawmakers that tackling addiction sweeping the state isn't easy and it will take a sustained effort to reach individuals impaired by drugs or alcohol.

"The thinking isn't logical," said Sprintz, who practices anesthesiology, pain management and addiction medicine in Houston. "It took me literally losing everything to think, 'Huh, maybe I have a problem.'"

Kentucky's opioid addiction crisis was the the subject of an unusual daylong meeting Wednesday in Frankfort, where a legislative committee heard from experts on the wave of heroin and prescription pill abuse engulfing many Kentucky communities.

And the news isn't good, Van Ingram, executive director of the state office of drug control policy told the joint House-Senate Health and Welfare Committee.

"When the clock strikes midnight tonight, four Kentuckians will have died of a drug overdose," he said. "When the clock strikes midnight tonight, 140 Americans will have died from a drug overdose. These deaths are preventable, and they don't have to happen."

Jennifer Hancock, president of the regional Volunteers of America chapter in Louisville, which provides addiction services, called Kentucky's opioid problem "a public health catastrophe."

Drugs including heroin and increasingly, fentanyl — a powerful narcotic often mixed with heroin that can be lethal in low doses — continue to ravage the state to the point where some emergency responders are feeling "opioid fatigue" from reviving overdose victims, some repeatedly, Ingram said.

"It took over 2 1/2 decades to get into this epidemic and sadly, I think it's going to take a lot more time to get out of it," Ingram said.

Abuse of such drugs continues to take a "lethal toll" on Kentucky, driving up overdose deaths to unprecedented levels, according to the 2016 Overdose Fatality Report by the Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy.

The report, released June 27, found that 1,404 people died from drug overdoses in 2016, a 7.4 percent increase over the previous year. Increased use of fentanyl is contributing to overdose deaths, the report found.

While nearly every community in Kentucky experienced overdose deaths, the toll was highest in Louisville, Lexington and northern Kentucky, the report found.

Ingram said the deadly fentanyl trend appears to be continuing, with that drug involved in more than half of this year's overdose deaths.

Still, Ingram and others who addressed the committee said they hope access to treatment and other efforts will turn things around.

"People do recover," Ingram said.

Hancock, with the VOA, said her agency has had tremendous success with Freedom House, a program it offers pregnant women who suffer from addiction.

By reaching them early in the pregnancy and offering them housing and treatment, the VOA has been able to help women get off drugs and deliver healthy babies not impaired by drugs.

The average cost of an infant born with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, impaired by drugs the mother took, is about $100,000, Hancock said. That's because most such babies require lengthy stays in intensive care, with most costs born by the state's Medicaid program.

Just 10 healthy babies represents a savings of $1 million, she said.

So far, the VOA has helped 150 women deliver babies unaffected by drugs, Hancock said, but the demand for their services grows. 

Sen. Julie Raque Adams, a Louisville Republican and chairwoman of the Senate health committee, wondered whether more such programs are needed.

"Do we have enough Freedom Houses to take care of these moms?" she asked.

Hancock said VOA recently broke ground on a second campus to help with the demand for services by pregnant women, funded through private fundraising and $500,000 from Louisville Metro Government. But that may not be enough, she told lawmakers.

"We need to continue to do more and we need your help," she said.

Lawmakers appeared concerned by the testimony but also will be confronted with a tight budget and competing demands for funds, including the state's acutely underfunded public pension system, when they convene in 2018 for the next legislative session. Meanwhile, Gov. Matt Bevin has proposed cuts of 17 percent in most state agencies to deal with a projected shortfall in the current fiscal year.

Still Rep. Addia Wuchner, a Burlington Republican and chair of the House Health and Family Services Committee, said Wednesday's meeting was a chance for lawmakers to get more information about the problem she described as a "ravenous beast."

"Addiction is destroying families and lives, it erodes communities," she said. "People with addiction are suffering from a chemical disease that afflicts the brain and destroys the body."

She also suggested compassion for those experiencing addiction.

"No one chooses this life," Wuchner said.

Sprintz, the Houston physician, said those seeking to help people with addiction must consider the trauma they may have experienced or emotional pain they are suffering, invoking his own experiences as a medical student.

"On paper, I looked freaking awesome," he said. "But I hated myself. I hated my life. In my head I had fooled everyone."

By Deborah Yetter
The Courier-Journal