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Date: 05-25-2017

Beshear: Steep prescription discounts sign of fake pharmacy scam

 

FRANKFORT – Attorney General Andy Beshear issued a Scam Alert Thursday to warn of a scam targeting Kentucky families and seniors who are seeking to save money on their prescription drugs.

Staff at the Cabinet for Health and Family Services, Office of Inspector General, contacted Beshear’s office after intercepting a phone caller attempting to lure in an unsuspecting victim by offering well-known prescription drugs for pennies on the dollar.

Beshear said once the caller has the victim’s financial information they charge hundreds of thousands of dollars in unauthorized transactions on the victim’s credit card and the prescription drugs never arrive.

“This is a scam that attempts to extort money from those who are seeking relief from the cost of their prescription drugs,” Beshear said in a news release. “I appreciate the Cabinet for Health and Family Services for reporting this scam and working with my office to help make sure Kentuckians have the information they need to avoid falling victim.”

Beshear said the best way to avoid this type of scam is to know the signs of a fake pharmacy compared to a legitimate pharmacy. He recommends these tips from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Signs of a fake pharmacy:

*  Offers very cheap prices

*  A prescription is not required to buy drugs

*  Located outside of the United States

*  Not licensed in the United States

Trustworthy pharmacies always:

*  Require a legitimate prescription

*  Provide a physical address and telephone number in the United States

*  Offer a pharmacist to answer your questions

*  Have a license with the state board of pharmacy

To verify a pharmacy’s license in Kentucky visit the Kentucky Board of Pharmacy website, or visit the FDA website for additional safe pharmacy information. 

To help Kentuckians stay ahead of scammers Beshear created Scam Alerts. The service allows Beshear’s office to send a text message or email alert to those signed up when new and trending scams are reported to his office. Each alert includes tips on how to spot and avoid the scam, and information on where to report any occurrences. 

Kentuckians interested in receiving Scam Alerts can text the words KYOAG Scam to GOV311 (468311), or visit ag.ky.gov/scams to sign up with your mobile phone number or email address.

To report scams to the Office of the Attorney General call 888-432-9257 or file a consumer complaint online.

 

Eastern Kentucky University will offer an online degree in risk management and insurance beginning in Fall 2017

 

The bachelor’s of business administration will be the only online undergraduate insurance degree offered in Kentucky and one of the few available in the United States.

The EKU risk management and insurance degrees are accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB) and have been offered on campus since 1977. The College of Business and Technology selected the bachelor’s of business administration in risk management and insurance as its first fully online degree due to increased demand from those in the profession.

“Our online program will have the same rigor and quality as the on-campus program,” said Dr. Thomas L. Erekson, dean of the College of Business and Technology. “Students will take the same courses and study with the same professors. It’s a unique opportunity for those working in the field or looking for a new career to continue their education.”

Thanks to an agreement between EKU and the American Institute for Chartered Property Casualty Underwriters, online students will also be able to waive two of the exams required for CPCU certification. Graduates are prepared for careers in risk management, underwriting, claims adjustment, company operations, agency and brokerage, and related occupations.

Burning Glass Labor Insight reported that regional demand for bachelor’s-level risk management and insurance professionals grew 50 percent between 2013 and 2016. According to the Ohio Insurance Institute, those with a bachelor’s degree and multiple years of related work experience can earn $50,000-$100,000 annually.

EKU Online students will benefit from:

· quality instruction from an accredited brick-and-mortar university.
· a 100-percent online program with no required campus visits.
· accelerated eight-week terms rather than the traditional 16-week format.
· advisers who will work with them from application through graduation.

Applications are now being accepted for the fall term. For more information, visit https://go.eku.edu/rmionline.

EKU Online provides more than 30 online degree options and has received numerous honors, including being named one of the best online colleges in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

EKU to offer bachelor’s in social work online

Eastern Kentucky University will offer the bachelor’s degree in social work (BSW) online in Fall 2017. The new format will prepare students for success in a growing field.

“Individuals in social work bring a strong commitment to serving others to their work,” said Dr. Sara Zeigler, interim dean of the EKU College of Letters, Arts & Social Sciences. “They are passionate, dedicated and public-spirited.”

In addition to personal fulfillment, social work offers a positive employment outlook. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that specialty areas within the field could grow nearly three times as fast as what is predicted for all other occupations. Moreover, salaries for social workers are increasing steadily.

According to salary.com, the average annual salary for a social worker in the Ohio Valley region (including Ohio, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Indiana and Illinois) is $46,000 to $60,000, depending on the location.

Social workers with bachelor’s degrees may find employment in a variety of fields, including mental health, substance abuse treatment, criminal justice, child welfare and gerontology.

“Many of those currently working in the field need a bachelor’s degree to advance in the profession,” said Dr. Caroline Reid, associate professor and coordinator of the online program. “It’s a privilege to offer an online program to meet their needs.”

From EKU Communications

 


FRANKFORT, Ky. (March 10, 2017) – The Senate gave final passage to a measure this week to expand the state’s broadband access by codifying the Kentucky Communications Network Authority (KCNA). Created through an executive order, KCNA is responsible for managing the Commonwealth’s open-access broadband network known as KentuckyWired. KentuckyWired’s focus is to position Kentucky as a national leader in high-capacity internet services.

House Bill 343, sponsored by Rep. Larry Brown, R-Prestonsburg, will specifically help rural communities that do not have access to a broadband network.

“Through these changing times, internet access is imperative to the success of our rural communities,” said Rep. Brown. “We continue to work to diversify Eastern Kentucky’s economy, and KentuckyWired will not only allow that diversification to proceed, but grow our tourism, advance higher education, improve healthcare access, and better the overall lives of Kentuckians. I commend the General Assembly for swiftly passing this measure and supporting the advancements of Eastern Kentucky.”

Kentucky currently ranks near the bottom of national and international rankings of broadband capacity, putting our state at a major disadvantage for attracting jobs and expanding education. The KCNA, through KentuckyWired, will better the Commonwealth by promoting economic growth and drastically improving our quality of life.

The bill is headed to Governor Bevin’s desk for his signature.

Coal mining employment has fallen from 31,000 in 1990 to just over 6,300

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) - Lawmakers in coal-producing Kentucky voted Wednesday to lift a ban on building nuclear power plants in a move one detractor called a “kick in the teeth” to the slumping coal sector.

According to The scientific American magazine, coal ash is more radioactive that nuclear waste.According to The scientific American magazine, coal ash is more radioactive that nuclear waste.The House passed the bill 65-28, sending it to Gov. Matt Bevin. The Republican governor has signaled he would not veto the measure if it reached his desk.

For years, efforts to open the door to nuclear energy melted down in a state that has been culturally and economically dominated by coal. Kentucky is the country’s third-largest coal producer, and politicians from both parties have promised to revive the struggling industry.

But the measure is on the verge of becoming law in Kentucky’s first legislative session in memory where Republicans controlled the House, Senate and governor’s office.

The bill’s House supporters said Wednesday it would take a decade or more for developers to get a nuclear power plant operational in Kentucky due to the rigorous permitting process.

But that didn’t satisfy Republican Rep. Jim Gooch Jr., who represents some of western Kentucky’s coalfields. Gooch invoked coal’s historic role in powering the state and the sector’s deep slump while speaking out against the measure.

“While I don’t really believe that this bill does that much to really affect coal, I think it’s a kick in the teeth that our coal industry shouldn’t be facing right now,” he said.
Kentucky’s coal industry has been steadily declining for decades. Coal mining employment has fallen from 31,000 in 1990 to just over 6,300. Three years ago, coal-fired power plants provided 93 percent of the state’s electricity. Today, that has fallen to 83 percent, according to the Kentucky Coal Association, as older plants are being shut down and replaced by natural gas.

The bill lifting the decades-old moratorium has been pushed by local government and business leaders in western Kentucky, which was home to a uranium enrichment plant that closed in 2013. That left the area teeming with skilled workers who had no hope of employment in their field.

Western Kentucky lawmakers who shepherded the bill through the House said lifting the moratorium won’t result in any immediate nuclear power plant construction.

“There is no expectation that the commonwealth will have a nuclear reactor constructed in it anytime soon,” said Republican Rep. Steven Rudy. “Should this bill become law, as a matter of fact, it will take a decade or more, probably decades, before an applicant could possibly wade through the regulatory environment before bringing a reactor online.”

Kentucky is one of 15 states that restrict the construction of new nuclear power facilities, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.
The bill requires Kentucky officials to review the state’s permitting process to ensure costs and “environmental consequences” are taken into account.

 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2017

SOCIAL MEDIA CREATES ECHO CHAMBERS THAT HURT DEMOCRACY, JOURNALISM, SAYS AUTHOR/LAW PROFESSOR

Social media limits exposure to different viewpoints and hurts democracy and journalism, Harvard University law professor and author Cass Sunstein told NPR's Kelly McEvers on "All Things Considered." Sunstein's latest book, "#Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media," looks at how social media creates echo chambers, leading to news filters where people only look at news that reflects their ideals.

"You're listening to people who just agree with you or reading news sources that fit with your own preconceptions, it's not as if you just stay where you are," Sunstein said. "You tend to end up more extreme, which makes us get kind of blocked as a society, which isn't good for democracy and which makes it possible for people to see people who disagree with them not as fellow citizens, but as enemies who are crazy people or dupes. And that can make problem solving very, very challenging."

"Well, we're early days, really, still for Facebook and social media," he said. "And so my expectation is that Facebook and Twitter will do some experimenting on this count. It is true that kind of a quick reaction is provide people with content that they will look at. And that might be the information cocoon effect. But lots of Americans have not just a desire to see, you know, what they already think, but a desire to see some stuff that'll be challenging or eye-opening."

Sunstein suggests following people with different viewpoints. He said, "if you're left of center, have a little plan in the next two weeks to follow some smart people who are right of center. And if you're right of center, and you tend to ridicule or contempt for people on the left, follow some liberals. Find some who have at least a little bit of credibility for you. Or make a determined judgment whether you're left or right. See what you can get from the other side. And this is, you know, individual lives, but as the framers of the constitution knew, a republic is built up of innumerable individual decisions. And whether we get a well-functioning system or not depends on, you know, countless individual acts." (Read more)

Written by Tim Mandell Posted at 2/23/2017 11:25:00 AM