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TheLevisaLazer.com - Technology

Wednesday, December 18, 2013 

Kentucky Judicial Branch launches eFiling with first electronic case filing in Franklin County;


The Administrative Office of the Courts introduced eFiling to Kentucky state courts this week by accepting the first electronic case filings at its test site in the office of Franklin County Circuit Court Clerk Sally Jump in Frankfort. The first case was filed Monday, Dec. 16, with a total of six cases filed as of today.

“This week’s electronic filings were the critical first step in providing eFiling to the legal community,” Chief Justice of Kentucky John D. Minton Jr. said. “Moving from a paper-based environment to one that is primarily electronic will transform the way Kentucky courts do business. The cost savings to the court system will be substantial and the state’s entire legal system will become more efficient when we process court cases electronically.”

Franklin County is a proof-of-concept site, which means that limited functions are being tested before the full eFiling program is rolled out in the pilot phase. The site will initially process only civil cases filed in Circuit Court. The Franklin County Office of Circuit Court Clerk is located in the new Franklin County Judicial Center at 222 St. Clair St. in Frankfort.

The AOC trained more than 10 attorneys from Franklin County to take part in this early testing.

“This launch begins a two-year process that should see eFiling in all 120 counties by the end of 2015,” AOC Director Laurie K. Dudgeon said. “I’m looking forward to Kentucky catching up with the federal courts and the other state courts that have been providing this valuable service for years.”

The proof-of-concept stage will prepare the AOC to set up pilot sites in a dozen or more Kentucky counties in 2014. The AOC will test all eFiling functions in the pilot counties for several months before beginning to implement the system statewide.

eFiling is part of the Judicial Branch’s comprehensive, multiyear eCourt program. The goal is to update Kentucky’s aging court technology to meet the demands on the court system and enable the courts to stay current with the mainstream of law and commerce.

The eCourt program will also upgrade the court system’s technology infrastructure (hardware and software), replace its case management systems for the trial and appellate courts, and acquire a document management system that will electronically store and index court documents.

The Judicial Branch cleared a major hurdle on its eCourt program in March 2013 when it received legislative approval to issue bonds to fund a new case management system. Resolving the funding issue jump-started the eFiling process and made it possible to begin the proof-of-concept testing in Franklin County by the end of 2013.

This week’s eFiling milestone followed quickly on the heels of another major court technology rollout. In March 2013, the AOC launched CourtNet 2.0, which replaced the outdated CourtNet application and provides real-time, online access to Kentucky court case information. CourtNet 2.0 was initially offered to members of the Kentucky Bar Association and will be made available to other groups in the coming months. For more about CourtNet 2.0, see the KBA’s Bench & Bar, May 2013, pages 54-55.

Kentucky Judicial Branch

The AOC is the operations arm of the state court system. The AOC executes the Judicial Branch budget and supports the activities of nearly 3,300 court system employees and 403 elected justices, judges and circuit court clerks. The chief justice of Kentucky is the administrative head of the court system and is responsible for its operation.

Contact Information:  Leigh Anne Hiatt, APR
Public Information Officer
502-573-2350, x50031
Cell 859-619-7916
lhiatt@kycourts.net


Groundhog sees shadow, 6 more weeks of bad weather?

East Ky. snow may not pack as big a punch

For up to the minute conditions and forecasts go to The Lazer's Weather Channel Feature Here

Groundhog Day 2014: Punxsutawney Phil sees shadow, 6 more weeks of winter BY JASON SAMENOW February 2 at 7:25 am (Getty images) (Getty images)  At 7:25 a.m. Sunday, a raw, cloudy and damp morning, Groundhog Phil saw his shadow in the small town of Punxsutawney, Pa. The appearance of Phil’s shadow means winter will extend well into March  according to folklore. Had Phil not seen his shadow, it would have meant spring is around the corner. Phil’s prediction may depress residents in the eastern U.S., weary from repeated outbreaks of arctic air.Groundhog Day 2014: Punxsutawney Phil sees shadow, 6 more weeks of winter BY JASON SAMENOW February 2 at 7:25 am (Getty images) (Getty images) At 7:25 a.m. Sunday, a raw, cloudy and damp morning, Groundhog Phil saw his shadow in the small town of Punxsutawney, Pa. The appearance of Phil’s shadow means winter will extend well into March according to folklore. Had Phil not seen his shadow, it would have meant spring is around the corner. Phil’s prediction may depress residents in the eastern U.S., weary from repeated outbreaks of arctic air.A winter storm that will begin as rain but change over to snow will hit Kentucky this evening and continue into Monday morning.

The National Weather Service office in Paducah has issued a winter storm warning from noon today to 3 a.m. Monday. Accumulations of 1 to 2 inches will be common in Western Kentucky, the weather service said, but some areas could see amounts of 3 to 4 inches.

At times, snow may mix with rain or change to sleet or freezing rain. The combination of snow, sleet and falling temperatures will create very hazardous travel conditions tonight.

Meanwhile, a winter storm warning remains in effect from 4 p.m. today to 7 a.m. Monday for Central Kentucky. Snowfall amounts of 3 to 5 inches are possible with even larger amounts in isolated areas, the weather service said. Snow should end by late Monday morning.

Road conditions will be hazardous in Central Kentucky, the weather service said.

In Eastern Kentucky, the weather service office in Jackson has issued a winter storm warning from 5 p.m. today until 10 a.m. Monday. Snowfall amounts of 6 to 9 inches are expected.

Roads will be slick and snow covered and the weather service predicted it will have a significant impact on travel Monday morning.

The weather service office in Wilmington, Ohio, predicted 3 to 6 inches of snow for Northern and Northeast Kentucky. A winter storm warning remains in effect from 4 p.m. today to 10 a.m. Monday. And road conditions in the region will be slick and hazardous, the weather service said.

Kentucky Press News Service

Web TV Wire


Google Fights Back After YouTube Comments Spam Increased | Google+ Integration Staying

Posted: 26 Nov 2013 06:38 PM PST

Google has finally addressed the issues affecting the new YouTube comments system, controversially rolled out earlier this month.

Unfortunately, while small changes are being made to plaster over the cracks, the elephant in the room that is Google+ is going nowhere. In fact, Google refuses to even address the part its social networking integration has played in the mess.

Google Admits Problem

In the weeks since the new YouTube comments system was pushed out to an unsuspecting public, things haven’t gone well. But Google has remained silent on the issues, both big and small, preferring instead to make small changes behind the scenes.

Now, finally, Google has admitted there are problems inherent in the new Google+-powered system, though it won’t admit Google+ is at fault for any of them.

In a post on the YouTube Creator Blog, “the YouTube comments team” admits the new system “introduced new opportunities for abuse.” These include the allowing of ASCII art and links, and the promotion of popular comments.

These are, according to YouTube, all being fixed, while threaded conversations, formatted comments, the moderation of old comments, and bulk moderation for new comments are being rolled out now or in the future.

The Truth

All of this proves beyond doubt that the Google+ integration wasn’t ever intended as a fix but was instead purely a way of forcing YouTube’s massive audience of users into signing up and using Google’s social networking effort.

What’s sad is that while Google has now admitted there’s a problem (or three) and promised to issue fixes for them, it didn’t even acknowledge the vitriolic response to the forced Google+ integration.

In other words don’t expect the company to even consider a reversal of the original decision, despite more than 215,000 people having (at the time of writing) signed an online petition to persuade the company to do just that.

The new Google+-powered YouTube comments system is here to stay, and nothing anyone does is going to change Google’s mind on that in the future.

Conclusions

Google has really messed up on this one. Change is inevitable, and often good, but this major change to a beloved website hasn’t delivered what was promised. It’s going to be painful watching Google trying to patch up a system that was clearly broken from day one.

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