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TheLevisaLazer.com - Technology


Groundhog sees shadow, 6 more weeks of bad weather?

East Ky. snow may not pack as big a punch

For up to the minute conditions and forecasts go to The Lazer's Weather Channel Feature Here

Groundhog Day 2014: Punxsutawney Phil sees shadow, 6 more weeks of winter BY JASON SAMENOW February 2 at 7:25 am (Getty images) (Getty images)  At 7:25 a.m. Sunday, a raw, cloudy and damp morning, Groundhog Phil saw his shadow in the small town of Punxsutawney, Pa. The appearance of Phil’s shadow means winter will extend well into March  according to folklore. Had Phil not seen his shadow, it would have meant spring is around the corner. Phil’s prediction may depress residents in the eastern U.S., weary from repeated outbreaks of arctic air.Groundhog Day 2014: Punxsutawney Phil sees shadow, 6 more weeks of winter BY JASON SAMENOW February 2 at 7:25 am (Getty images) (Getty images) At 7:25 a.m. Sunday, a raw, cloudy and damp morning, Groundhog Phil saw his shadow in the small town of Punxsutawney, Pa. The appearance of Phil’s shadow means winter will extend well into March according to folklore. Had Phil not seen his shadow, it would have meant spring is around the corner. Phil’s prediction may depress residents in the eastern U.S., weary from repeated outbreaks of arctic air.A winter storm that will begin as rain but change over to snow will hit Kentucky this evening and continue into Monday morning.

The National Weather Service office in Paducah has issued a winter storm warning from noon today to 3 a.m. Monday. Accumulations of 1 to 2 inches will be common in Western Kentucky, the weather service said, but some areas could see amounts of 3 to 4 inches.

At times, snow may mix with rain or change to sleet or freezing rain. The combination of snow, sleet and falling temperatures will create very hazardous travel conditions tonight.

Meanwhile, a winter storm warning remains in effect from 4 p.m. today to 7 a.m. Monday for Central Kentucky. Snowfall amounts of 3 to 5 inches are possible with even larger amounts in isolated areas, the weather service said. Snow should end by late Monday morning.

Road conditions will be hazardous in Central Kentucky, the weather service said.

In Eastern Kentucky, the weather service office in Jackson has issued a winter storm warning from 5 p.m. today until 10 a.m. Monday. Snowfall amounts of 6 to 9 inches are expected.

Roads will be slick and snow covered and the weather service predicted it will have a significant impact on travel Monday morning.

The weather service office in Wilmington, Ohio, predicted 3 to 6 inches of snow for Northern and Northeast Kentucky. A winter storm warning remains in effect from 4 p.m. today to 10 a.m. Monday. And road conditions in the region will be slick and hazardous, the weather service said.

Kentucky Press News Service

Web TV Wire


Google Fights Back After YouTube Comments Spam Increased | Google+ Integration Staying

Posted: 26 Nov 2013 06:38 PM PST

Google has finally addressed the issues affecting the new YouTube comments system, controversially rolled out earlier this month.

Unfortunately, while small changes are being made to plaster over the cracks, the elephant in the room that is Google+ is going nowhere. In fact, Google refuses to even address the part its social networking integration has played in the mess.

Google Admits Problem

In the weeks since the new YouTube comments system was pushed out to an unsuspecting public, things haven’t gone well. But Google has remained silent on the issues, both big and small, preferring instead to make small changes behind the scenes.

Now, finally, Google has admitted there are problems inherent in the new Google+-powered system, though it won’t admit Google+ is at fault for any of them.

In a post on the YouTube Creator Blog, “the YouTube comments team” admits the new system “introduced new opportunities for abuse.” These include the allowing of ASCII art and links, and the promotion of popular comments.

These are, according to YouTube, all being fixed, while threaded conversations, formatted comments, the moderation of old comments, and bulk moderation for new comments are being rolled out now or in the future.

The Truth

All of this proves beyond doubt that the Google+ integration wasn’t ever intended as a fix but was instead purely a way of forcing YouTube’s massive audience of users into signing up and using Google’s social networking effort.

What’s sad is that while Google has now admitted there’s a problem (or three) and promised to issue fixes for them, it didn’t even acknowledge the vitriolic response to the forced Google+ integration.

In other words don’t expect the company to even consider a reversal of the original decision, despite more than 215,000 people having (at the time of writing) signed an online petition to persuade the company to do just that.

The new Google+-powered YouTube comments system is here to stay, and nothing anyone does is going to change Google’s mind on that in the future.

Conclusions

Google has really messed up on this one. Change is inevitable, and often good, but this major change to a beloved website hasn’t delivered what was promised. It’s going to be painful watching Google trying to patch up a system that was clearly broken from day one.

THURSDAY, NOV. 14, 2013

Nonprofit says 72 percent of schools lack broadband speeds needed to fully use the Internet;


Rural broadband towerRural broadband towerElliston Elementary School in rural Montana is "on the wrong side of the new digital divide in this country," Lyndsey Layton writes for The Washington Post. Although they have laptops and whiteboards, the connection isn't fast enough for the teachers and students to utilize the many facets of technology such as videos, music, graphics and interactive programs. Rural schools aren't the only ones lacking adequate broadband.

According to Education Superhighway, a nonprofit dedicated to improving digital access in schools, 72 percent of public schools—in the country, suburbs and cities—do not have adequate broadband speeds to fully access the Internet.

"Wiring schools has brought the Internet to the principal's office or maybe a teacher's desk," said Evan Marwell, the chief executive of the group. "But we need to move this technology into the learning process, and that means 55 million students." President Obama proposed that all public schools get high-speed broadband and wireless Internet within the next five years, Layton writes. He said, "In a country where we expect free wi-fi with our coffee, why shouldn't we have it in our schools?"

Under Obama's plan, the Department of Education would train teachers in technology implementation for classroom instruction. It could be funded by increasing E-rate, the extra charge the government added to telephone bills in 1997. E-rate also gives schools and libraries 20 percent to 90 percent discounts on telecommunication costs. The program has already helped bring schools up to date; at the start, 14 percent of schools had Internet access, and now 99 percent have it, according to the Obama administration, Layton writes.

But schools still need faster broadband to support multiple new devices like tablets and smartphones and education applications."There are amazing learning opportunities, ability to have access to engaging digital content, ability to connect to experts and learners around the country through the smart use of technology," said Richard Culatta, director of the Education Department's Office of Educational Technology.

Broadband improvements will become even more important with the addition of the Common Core academic standards in reading and math for grades K-12—which 45 states and the District of Columbia will implement—that will require the administration of online exams. "The primary issue is bandwidth," Jacqueline King of the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, said. Plans to improve the situation include increasing the E-rate budget and keeping a closer eye on what exactly schools spend the money on. "Some experts say that federal government should consider a one-time investment to bring adequate broadband capacity to all schools," Layton writes. That could cost $11 billion. (Read more)

Written by Melissa Landon Posted at 11/14/2013 02:19:00 PM

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