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SHELTER KITTIES OF THE WEEK

This week we are featuring some great kitties who would make great companion in any home.  Each feline has a very sweet disposition and gets along well with the other kitties at the Shelter. They are litter box trained, vaccinated, dewormed, and will be fixed before leaving the Shelter. To find out more about these special kitties (or any of the other wonderful kitties at the Shelter), call the Shelter at 606-673-4509 Mon-Fri 10-2pm. After hours and weekends call or txt Beverly Pack (LC Humane Society Volunteer) at (606) 571-6224 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Call for a quicker response.

Max Benson Ivy

This big gorgeous boy is MAX and he is such a big lovable teddy bear. He is a very laid back guy and would make a great companion for someone who likes a friend to just chill with.  MAX is just waiting for his own special human to take him home. He is already neutered and up to date on all shots so he’s ready for a new home today!!

Look what a little cutie this fella is!! This is BENSON and he is just waiting for his own special human to take him home.  He is just the sweetest little kitty, and he has a huge personality to go along with his amazing good looks. Don’t miss out on adopting this little doll today!!

This little doll baby is named IVY!! She is a gorgeous short hair light-brown Tabby with black Tiger Stripes. IVY is just as sweet as she can be and loves attention. She is also very playful. Why not add this little bundle of furr-n-purrs to your family?  You’ll be glad you did.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2014;

U.S. proposes putting four freshwater turtles on international endangered species list...

snapping turtleThe U.S. has proposed putting four species of freshwater turtles, whose meat is considered a delicacy in some Asian countries, on "an international endangered species list, in part to better monitor exports of the species," Ros Krasny reports for Reuters. "Under the plan, the common snapping turtle, Florida softshell turtle, smooth softshell turtle and spiny softshell turtle would be listed under the Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), a global pact ratified by 180 countries."(Wikipedia photo: Common snapping turtle) 

Turtle exports have been on the rise in recent years, with 811,717 live common snapping turtles exported from the U.S. in 2011, a 24 percent increase from 2009, Krasny writes. Live Florida softshell turtle and spiny softshell turtle or turtle egg exports also jumped from 2009 to 2011. The proposal is open to a 60-day public comment period. (Read more)

Written by Tim Mandell Posted at 10/30/2014 04:52:00 PM

SHELTER KITTIES OF THE WEEK

October 24, 2014

This week we are featuring some great kitties who would make great companion in any home.  Each feline has a very sweet disposition and gets along well with the other kitties at the Shelter. They are litter box trained, vaccinated, dewormed, and will be fixed before leaving the Shelter. To find out more about these special kitties (or any of the other wonderful kitties at the Shelter), call the Shelter at 606-673-4509 Mon-Fri 10-2pm. After hours and weekends call or txt Beverly Pack (LC Humane Society Volunteer) at (606) 571-6224 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Call for a quicker response.

 

Magnolia Murphy Tara

MAGNOLIA is a gorgeous long haired beauty with silvery gray fur and hints of light peach patches scattered across her body. She is stunning!! MAGNOLIA is a very sweet little girl and she loves attention. She also gets along very well with the other kitties she shares a room with at the Shelter. Don’t delay or you will miss out on this little beauty!!

Look at this very unique adorable little girl named MURPHY!!! She is a Diluted Calico & Tabby mix---which means she is a Diluted Tabico!! And look at her gorgeous big green eyes—just amazing! MURPHY is a very feisty little girl and she loves to play and wrestle with her playmates in the foster home where she is being raised. She is drop dead gorgeous. SHE IS NOT AT THE SHELTER. PLEASE CALL BEVERLY PACK at 606-571-6224 for information.

I can’t even describe how gorgeous this little kitty is!! This is TARA and she has the most prominent Tiger Stripes but her body is also almost two-tone color with light orange fading in & out. Some people would refer to her as being a Torbie (Tiger Stripe & Tortoiseshell mix). She is gorgeous. TARA is a very sweet and playful little kitty and would make a great new family member in any home. Come in right away and make this baby a new member of your family today.  You’ll be glad you did.

 

Date: 10-30-2014

Deer jumps through storefront window...

The State Journal

It was an unusual scene at Frankfort's Brighton Park Shopping Center Wednesday evening after a deer jumped through the glass of a vacant storefront.

Frankfort Police Maj. Robert Warfel said it happened around 6:30 p.m. at the Shoe Exchange, a store that has been closed and empty for several months.

The deer was badly cut from breaking through the glass, Warfel said, but still moving around the store.

Fish and Wildlife officials were called to the scene, where they made the decision to euthanize the injured deer.

No people were hurt during the incident, Warfel said.

 

Date: 10-24-2014;

Louisville Zoo witnesses python's virgin births

By James Bruggers
Courier-Journal

 

Who needs males?

Not the world's largest snakes, and the Louisville Zoo has the reticulated python to prove it.

Zoo officials said Thursday that one of their female reticulated pythons, Thelma, gave birth to six baby pythons without the aid of a male python. She shared exhibit space only with another female python, Louise.

Go figure.

The zoo did, with the help of a University of Tulsa expert — assistant professor of biological sciences Warren Booth, who has been documenting phenomenon of virgin birth in other snakes in recent years.

While the concept of virgin birth may be well known from the Bible, through the story of Mary and Jesus, that's not science.

But it turns out that science is finding a growing number of female animals that normally reproduce sexually can also get it done without males, with an initial discovery in the 1890s involving domestic pigeons, Booth said.

"It's not a rare event," he said. "It actually appears to be very common."

READ MORE: Louisville Zoo narrows list in name-that-hippo contest

Domestic chickens and turkeys, Komodo dragons, hammerhead sharks, even some song birds have demonstrated the ability to reproduce asexually, with a flurry of new discoveries in the last decade as genetic analysis has improved, he said.

But until the zoo's Thelma popped out a clutch of 61 eggs two years ago, and the Tulsa research team was able to study the genetics of the mother and its six surviving offspring, it had never been documented before in that species, said the zoo's Bill McMahan. He's curator of ectotherms, which are animals that depend external sources of body heat.

"I think this has probably occurred before, but maybe was attributed to (male) sperm storage or retention," McMahon said.

"The public probably isn't very well aware of this," said Anthony J. Lentz, chair of the Bellarmine University Department of Biology. "But it is pretty neat."

Zoo officials said that with Thelma, it worked something like this: The reproduction occurred through a process known as terminal fusion automixis, where certain cells known as polar bodies behave like sperm. They fuse with an egg and trigger cell division and development, completing what biologists call parthenogenesis.

The offspring are half clones, with genetic material only from the mother instead of a normal mix of genes from the mother and a male.

It's a "very extreme form of inbreeding," which can be a problem genetically, especially over the long term, Booth said.

Booth said the unconventional reproductive strategy could be useful, helping a species survive during a shortage of males, but the offspring would need to eventually find a mate to maintain genetic diversity.

Booth and seven researchers, including McMahan, co-authored a research paper on whole thing that was published in June in the Biological Journal of the LinneanSociety, titled "New insights on facultative parthenogensis in pythons." The paper detailed the genetic analysis that confirmed the finding.

The zoo is caring for the six young pythons, members of a species that can grow to 25 feet long and weigh 300 pounds, though they are not on exhibit, said Kyle Shepherd, zoo spokeswoman. Booth said he hopes to collaborate with the zoo again by studying them as they grow.

Shepherd said zoo officials are pleased to participate. "Anytime you can be a part of contributing to the canon of what the world knows about a certain species it's a great day (and) a great year," she said.

As for mammals ... while there's that biblical story of virgin birth, there's no scientific evidence of asexual reproduction ever among mammals in nature, though scientists have done it with mice in a lab setting, Booth said.

Mammals, including humans, are just too complicated, Booth said.

"The mother and father must contribute specific genes to create a viable offspring," he said.