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Auto Mechanic School: Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) can apply to gain paid, hands-on experience with local Department of Highways maintenance garages Auto Mechanic School: Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) can apply to gain paid, hands-on experience with local Department of Highways maintenance garages

Ky. Transportation Cabinet revs up new apprenticeship program for future mechanics

FRANKFORT, Ky. (June 16, 2017) – Beginning this fall, students enrolled in an automotive or diesel technology program with the Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) can apply to gain paid, hands-on experience with local Department of Highways maintenance garages through the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet’s (KYTC) new Transportation Mechanic Apprenticeship Program (TMAP).

As the state’s first automotive technician apprenticeship program registered with the Kentucky Labor Cabinet’s Division of Apprenticeship (and one of only two such programs in the Commonwealth listed with the Labor Cabinet), TMAP presents a unique opportunity for high school graduates entering the workforce and for individuals seeking a new career pathway.

“Partnering with KCTCS to provide an automotive technician apprenticeship program benefits Kentucky’s workforce and assists our KYTC mission,” said Transportation Sec. Greg Thomas. “TMAP apprentices will help maintain and repair the equipment our road crews use to provide a safe and reliable transportation system for all who travel Kentucky’s roadways. TMAP also offers opportunities for Kentuckians to improve their quality of life through practical training as they work toward their associate’s degree.”

Whether apprentices continue their career with KYTC after graduating the program or decide to pursue an automotive position elsewhere, they will have a nationally recognized certification to present to future employers.

The Kentucky Occupational Outlook to 2024 (for years 2014-2024) indicates an 11.5 percent increase in demand for automotive service technicians and mechanics and a 22.5 percent increase for bus and truck mechanics and diesel engine specialists. Currently, KYTC has a demand for individuals across Kentucky who possess the skills specific to those trades.

“Under the Labor Cabinet’s ‘Kentucky Trained. Kentucky Built.’ initiative, our goal is to increase apprenticeship programs and expand the variety of trades represented to meet workforce goals throughout the state,” said Labor Sec. Derrick Ramsey. “The demand for highly skilled laborers isn’t exclusive to the private sector; public agencies need employees with specialized skill sets as well.”

To be considered for KYTC’s TMAP, an individual must be at least 18 years old, possess a valid driver’s license, have an acceptable criminal record report and be enrolled in an automotive or diesel technology program through KCTCS. Interested TMAP candidates can take advantage of the close proximity of hands-on training and educational opportunities.

“The statewide availability of KYTC’s apprenticeship program locations offers Kentuckians seeking a career the convenience of not having to commute long distances,” said Ramona Brock, KYTC apprenticeship program coordinator. “Transportation maintenance garages are located in all 12 districts, and KCTCS provides an automotive program in every district and a diesel technology program in nine of the 12 districts.”

Apprentices participating in TMAP will gain 2,000 hours of combined coursework and hands-on experience over a period of two years and will be subject to a four-month probationary period. Work ethic and willingness to learn and take direction are necessary for satisfactory completion of the program. TMAP apprentices will receive increasing pay opportunities, starting at $9.50 per hour and potentially advancing to $14.42 upon graduating. After satisfactorily completing TMAP, graduates will receive a nationally recognized credential in addition to their two-year college degree.

KYTC’s Transportation Mechanic Apprenticeship Program meets national standards for registration with the U.S. Department of Labor and the Kentucky Labor Cabinet’s Division of Apprenticeship.

TMAP candidates can access additional information about the program and download an application at http://transportation.ky.gov/Education or can email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The deadline to submit a TMAP application is Sept. 15.

 

 

Date: 06-14-2017

Shooter dead, six wounded in attack on GOP group playing baseball

U.S. Senator Rand Paul, (R-Ky)U.S. Senator Rand Paul, (R-Ky)

U.S. Senator Rand Paul, R-Kentucky, was present at the scene of a multiple shooting in Alexandria, Virginia Wednesday morning.

Paul told MSNBC's Morning Joe that he was in the batting cage when the incident occurred.

"I was in a lucky spot, and I hope everybody does OK," he said.

The incident occurred at a baseball diamond in Alexandria, Virginia where Republican members of Congress and their staffs were practicing for the annual Congressional baseball game scheduled for Thursday.

An assailant, who is in custody, according to CBS News, reportedly fired a number of shots from a rifle and pistol.

A Louisiana congressman, House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, a Republican, was wounded in the hip by the gunman. In addition, two members of the Capital Police were also wounded, as well as at least one congressional aide. The gunman was also wounded. Six people were shot. It reportedly took about 10 minutes before the shooter was subdued. The shooter reportedly asked a congressman on the scene if the group practicing was Democrats or Republicans before he began firing.

Persons on the scene said a number of members of Congress were at the practice. Two were senators with Rand Paul being one of them.

Democrats were having their own early-morning practice at a different facility at another location.

By Thomas Novelly and Darcy Costello
The Courier-Journal

Here's the story:

Rep. Chuck Fleischmann, R-Tenn. is seen near the scene of the shooting in Alexandria, Va. Cliff Owen APRep. Chuck Fleischmann, R-Tenn. is seen near the scene of the shooting in Alexandria, Va. Cliff Owen AP

An assailant, who is in custody, according to CBS News, reportedly fired a number of shots from a rifle and pistol.

A Louisiana congressman, House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, a Republican, was wounded in the hip by the gunman. In addition, two members of the Capital Police were also wounded, as well as at least one congressional aide. The gunman was also wounded. Six people were shot. It reportedly took about 10 minutes before the shooter was subdued. The shooter reportedly asked a congressman on the scene if the group practicing was Democrats or Republicans before he began firing.

Persons on the scene said a number of members of Congress were at the practice. Two were senators with Rand Paul being one of them.

Democrats were having their own early-morning practice at a different facility at another location.


U.S. Rep. Steve Scalise, the third-ranking Republican in House leadership, was shot and injured during a baseball practice early Wednesday, and two Capitol Hill police officers and at least two others were also shot, according to congressmen who were at the scene.

The shooter, identified as James T. Hodgkinson, died in the hospital. According to the Belleville News-Democrat, he belonged to number of anti-Republican groups, including one called “Terminate the Republican Party.”

 

 

WASHINGTON, DC -- U.S. Rep. Harold "Hal" Rogers continues to advocate for federal support to revitalize coal country. During a federal budget hearing for fiscal year 2018 with Secretary Ryan Zinke from the U.S. Department of Interior, Rogers questioned why the agency proposed to eliminate important programs that would support ongoing efforts for economic growth in Central Appalachia.

I was completely flabbergasted in seeing in your budget request, the elimination of that program. This coming from an administration that I was led to believe wanted to help coal country. In eliminating this kind of program, it sends a glaring message to these desperate people who had a big impact in the recent election."I was completely flabbergasted in seeing in your budget request, the elimination of that program. This coming from an administration that I was led to believe wanted to help coal country. In eliminating this kind of program, it sends a glaring message to these desperate people who had a big impact in the recent election."Specifically, Secretary Zinke's budget would eliminate the Abandoned Mine Land (AML) Pilot Project that has provided a total of $195 million in fiscal years 2016 and 2017 for projects that reclaim abandoned mine lands and create jobs in states hardest hit by the downturn of the coal industry over the last eight years, including Kentucky.

"I come from coal country, or what used to be coal country. Now these towns have more plywood windows than paned glass," said Rogers, who serves as Chairman Emeritus of the House Appropriations Committee. "I've lost 12,000 coal mining jobs just in my district in the last few years, a good part of which was caused by the United States federal government under the last administration. The war on coal is real and unfortunately has had a devastating impact."

"The AML Pilot Program is a win-win. It's good for the environment and it's good for jobs. It has bipartisan support here in the Congress and we're seeing good results of projects that have been undertaken and delivered with this two-year pilot program. It's working and it's helping desperate areas of the country," continued Rogers. "It's limited to a few states where the impact has been the most severe. That's why I was completely flabergasted in seeing in your budget request, the elimination of that program. This coming from an administration that I was led to believe wanted to help coal country. In eliminating this kind of program, it sends a glaring message to these desperate people who had a big impact in the recent election."

Rogers also asked Secretary Zinke to "shake loose" a 2016 study of the pilot program that he requested from the Offce of Surface Mining and Reclamation Enforcement. Secretary Zinke committed to follow up on the report.

In addition, Rogers urged Secretary Zinke's support and collaboration on the bipartisan RECLAIM Act of 2017 that has been introduced in both the U.S. House and Senate. The RECLAIM Act of 2017 fast-tracks the release of $1 billion of available, unspent dollars in the federal Abandoned Mine Land (AML) Fund for the purpose of reclaming abandoned mine lands and economic development in coal country.

"The money must be used on abandoned mine lands, but with a bent toward economic development potential for creating jobs at the same time," said Rogers. "It's a multi-state bill. It has agreement in the west and east of the U.S., and from both parties and both houses of the Congress. And I would hope, Mr. Secretary, you would see your way clear to be supportive of that type of bill."

Secretary Zinke responded, "There are about 1,800 mines on the list for reclamation, but to turn those lands over to something productive is something I think is beneficial to us all."

For more information about the RECLAIM Act of 2017, visit halrogers.house.gov.

CONTACT: Danielle Smoot
(606) 679-8346

Authorities believe fugitive lawyer Eric C. Conn is still in the country after escaping court-ordered supervision Friday evening and are offering a $20,000 reward for information that helps catch him.

Gone now is the famous sign in Allen with a life size Eric C. Conn which helped him defraud taxpayers of $600 millionGone now is the famous sign in Allen with a life size Eric C. Conn which helped him defraud taxpayers of $600 millionPolice want to find Conn quickly before he has a chance to leave the U.S.

“We need him to face justice for defrauding the U.S. taxpayer,” Amy Hess, special agent in charge of the FBI in Kentucky, said at a news conference in Louisville on Wednesday.

Conn pleaded guilty in March to submitting false information on requests for his clients to receive federal disability payments, and to bribing a Social Security Administration judge to approve payments for thousands of Conn’s clients.

Conn made millions from the scheme, and paid the judge, David B. Daughterty, more than $600,000 from 2004 to 2011, according to court records.

Conn was out of jail on bond pending his sentencing in July, with the condition he post a large bond, be under house arrest and wear an electronic monitoring device — an ankle bracelet — to track his whereabouts.

As part of Conn’s plea deal, federal prosecutors agreed to recommend allowing him to remain free pending sentencing. U.S. District Judge Danny C. Reeves approved the request, continuing conditions imposed earlier by U.S. Magistrate Judge Robert E. Wier.

But after spending much of the day in Lexington on Friday preparing to possibly testify against a third man charged in the case, Conn cut off the ankle bracelet and disappeared Friday evening, according to the FBI.

Hess declined to discuss some details of the investigation, but said the bracelet was found thrown out along Interstate 75 in Lexington. She could not provide the exact location.

Cutting the bracelet prompted an alert. The U.S. Probation Office, which had Conn under supervision, notified the FBI.

Hess said the FBI was notified “very quickly.” Wier issued an arrest warrant for him on Saturday for violating his bond conditions.

Hess said authorities have information that suggests Conn is still in the country, but they’re not sure how much longer he will remain.

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BY BILL ESTEP
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Date: 06-02-2017

 Looks for viable House candidates 

Democratic House Minority Floor Leader Rocky Adkins, of Sandy Hook, told Franklin County Democrats he’s actively recruiting candidates to flip the Republican-controlled House asking for qualified candidates to ‘get off the bench and get into the game.’ (Brad Bowman/brad.bowman@state-journal.com)Democratic House Minority Floor Leader Rocky Adkins, of Sandy Hook, told Franklin County Democrats he’s actively recruiting candidates to flip the Republican-controlled House asking for qualified candidates to ‘get off the bench and get into the game.’ (Brad Bowman/This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Minority Floor Leader Rocky Adkins, D-Sandy Hook, is still considering making a run for the governorship in 2018, but he told Franklin County Democrats on Thursday he’s focused on recruiting viable House candidates who can get off the bench and get in the game.

Adkins, the 13-year majority floor leader before the Kentucky House of Representatives flipped in the last election to a Republican majority, told county Democrats at a party meeting he’s in the scouting process for viable House candidates who want to make a difference in their own local districts.

“There’s some dissatisfaction with what’s gone on in this past session and what’s going on in Washington, D.C.,” Adkins said. “It’s creating an opportunity of a lot of energy on the ground. People are coming off the sideline and getting involved in the process. Now, understanding they can make a difference.”

People repeatedly talk to him about the policies and controversies occurring at both the state and federal level, Adkins said, and he and his House caucus members plan to harness that power for the 2018 elections.

“Those policies passed … in the 30-day session, they were passed at rapid speed. Many of those complex issues, (were) many of those that impacted blue collar, middle class working people,” Adkins said. “Kentucky is a competitive state and we have been a competitive. Kentucky wasn’t a desert. We’ve had industry and business here for some time.”

The difference in policy and philosophy for House Democrats, Adkins said, is that the state can be both competitive, recruit and retain businesses and industry and stand for workers to make a decent wage that will drive the economy. The strongest economy, Adkins said, was built on the middle class.

Now that the Republican supermajority has passed right-to-work legislation, giving workers union benefits without the requirement to pay union fees, and passed repealing prevailing-wage legislation, which before required a company pay a base, average wage for state-funded construction projects, has squeezed the wallets of the middle class, Adkins said. 

“You may go out and speak about the momentum you’ve never had (as the Republican supermajority),” Adkins said. “But here’s what I’m going say to that, what have you done with your policy on those folks… you pass policy that drives down wages of middle class working people.”

House Republicans finished out Election Night winning 64 seats compared to 36 seats won by Democrats. Adkins, who was elected in 1997 and is serving his 30th year in the House, said that will change.

“A good part of my time right now is being spent recruiting candidates not to win back some of these seats but to win back the majority,” Adkins said. “I can tell you our recruitment is going very well. We have more people wanting to run for office because of this energy on the ground. It’s time to get involved and get off the bench and get in the game. A lot of these out-of state-issues are driven by out-of-state interests.”

Adkins told The State Journal he and his fellow caucus members remain busy traveling across the state for the recruitment process and the true change will happen at the organizational, grassroots level, but he’s still considering a run for the governorship. 

“I’m getting a lot of encouragement to do so. Of course, I’m concentrating right now on the task at hand and take back the majority in the House of Representatives. That’s where my commitment is,” Adkins said.

“There’s no question I’m looking at that possibility as a run for governor just because of the encouragement that I’m getting. I’m not going to let those people that are encouraging me, distract from the job that I’ve been given which is the Democratic leader of the House. I’m going to keep working hard at that. I’ve fought hard for policies I believe are good for people all across Kentucky. With the support of my family, which I think they are supportive, there’s no question we are giving it a serious look.”

By Brad Bowman
The State Journal