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Eagle Ridge Golf League News Bill JacksonBill Jackson

 

League Results for May 30, 2017

 

Unlike the prior week that was canceled due to the rain, the Eagle Ridge Golf course was in excellent condition on Tuesday, May 30, 2017. The course has reached its lush summer state, and the Tuesday’s temperature was perfect for playing golf. With all the rain that we’ve had, it's amazing how well the course has held up.

Next week will be the end of the 8-week session. New handicaps and total points will occur after the conclusion of next week’s play. The cancellation of the games this year due to the rain has played havoc with league calculations.

Now for Tuesday night’s results.

Scores

Low Net Score (34) Charlie Curnutte

Low Gross Score (36) Troy Hughes

Longest Drive (#7) Troy Hughes

Fewest Putts (13) Dan Preece

Skills Competition

Closest to the pin, 2nd shot (#11) Tom Copley

Longest Putt (#14) Dan Preece

Par 3, Closest to pin (#12) Bill Jackson

Par 3, Closest to pin (#8) No one hit the green

Skins Tom Copley

I’ll see you at the course on Tuesday, May 25 th.

Bill Jackson

Submitted, June 1, 2017

 

2017 youth-only and general seasons produced a total harvest of 33,061 turkeys 

 
Turkey hunters in Kentucky encountered wind, rain and wild temperature swings this past spring season but did not let factors out of their control keep them from posting impressive results.
The 2017 youth-only and general seasons produced a total harvest of 33,061 turkeys – a 6.5 percent increase over 2016 and the third highest on record for the state.
“We were expecting a pretty good harvest this spring because we had decent hatches in 2014 and in 2015,” said Zak Danks, wild turkey program coordinator with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. “We knew this would provide a bunch of 2- to 3-year-old gobblers for hunters to pursue. But seeing this spring’s big harvest was welcome news, and it’s a testament to the skill and passion of Kentucky hunters.”
Wild turkeys are found across the state thanks to an extensive restoration effort conducted from 1978-1997, and the spring turkey harvest has ballooned since hunters took 13,505 birds in the first modern day, statewide season in 1996.
 
The spring harvest has held steady since hunters bagged a record 36,097 birds in 2010 with an average of 31,814 birds taken in the seven seasons since 2010. By comparison, the average spring harvest in the seven seasons before 2010 was 26,982.
“Judging by our recent spring harvest totals, turkey populations are strong across the state,” Danks said. “I attribute this to our sound season timing and bag limit.”
Most counties show stable to increasing harvest totals while some have declined over the past five years. Danks believes any declines are due in part to a natural correction after high population years fueled by excellent poult production.Brood production has leveled off over the past decade, which Danks interprets as a sign the population is stabilizing with the habitat’s carrying capacity.
Carrying capacity is the number of animals the habitat can support and it can vary from year to year based on a variety of factors.
For more outdoors news and information, see Art Lander’s Outdoors on KyForward.
“Some states have seen population and harvest declines, so we want to be cautious and not put extra pressure on the population right now,” Danks said. “We are seeing pockets of counties with declining harvest, and several factors are probably impacting populations. Foremost is brood production and recruitment of young birds into the population during summer and fall."
“Weather and predators impact the hatch from year to year, but having enough nesting and brood-rearing habitat provides a strong buffer. We have biologists across the state who can help private landowners improve turkey habitat at the local level, so contact them for options.
But, again, our turkey population appears in good shape and we want to keep it that way.”The top five counties by total spring harvest in 2017 were Muhlenberg (682), Logan (663), Pulaski (610), Hart (606) and Ohio (556). When comparing the number of turkeys harvested per square mile in a county, Pendleton County was first in the state (1.76) followed by Campbell (1.56) and Bracken (1.53).
Kentucky ranks among the top among surrounding states in birds taken per square mile.
The final tally for the 2017 spring season was impressive considering the uneven weather encountered by hunters.
Average temperatures in April across Kentucky were among the warmest on record while most of the state was wetter than average.
The two-day youth season opened to below-normal temperatures and ended buffeted by wind. While the youth season harvest finished down 9 percent, it remains within 2 percent of the five-year average of 1,728 turkeys.
The 23-day general season opened on Easter weekend in April and closed May 7. Opening day weather was close to ideal but rain affected parts of the state that Sunday. Nevertheless, hunters posted the third highest opening weekend harvest behind 2010 and 2012. The 20,975 turkeys taken over the season’s final 21 days were a 4.9 percent increase over the previous year.
“This spring was just fantastic,” Danks said. “Now let’s cross our fingers for good weather over the next few weeks to help those broods survive and thrive. Let’s work to provide good habitat, too. Then let’s chase them again come fall.”
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Kevin Kelly is a writer for Kentucky Afield magazine, the official publication of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. An avid angler with a passion for muskellunge and stream fishing, his journalism career has included stops at daily newspapers in Cincinnati, St. Petersburg, Fla., and Charleston, S.C. Get the latest from Kelly and the entire Kentucky Afield staff by following them on Twitter: @kyafield.The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources manages, regulates, enforces and promotes responsible use of all fish and wildlife species, their habitats, public wildlife areas and waterways for the benefit of those resources and for public enjoyment. Kentucky Fish and Wildlife is an agency of the Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet. For more information on the department, click here.

By Kevin Kelly
Special to KyForward

An expansion from its historic range in the interior plains brought the coyote to Kentucky where as recently as the early 1970s sightings of these animals were still considered rare.

Coyotes are now common across the state but their presence in urban and suburban areas can surprise residents.

“People in cities like Los Angeles, Chicago and Denver have grown accustomed to seeing a coyote strolling through a city park,” said Laura Palmer, furbearer biologist with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. “In Kentucky, people are still getting used to seeing them in urban areas.”

Reports of coyote sightings in residential areas increase in the spring and early summer as coyotes breed and give birth to pups.

Since total eradication of coyotes is not possible, having a basic understanding about these wild animals, which can range in color from reddish to tan to grizzled gray and black, can ease concerns and limit potential conflicts.

“Coyotes are often misunderstood,” Palmer said. “Most do not bother people. Many times, people do not even know coyotes are living near their homes.”

Coyotes tend to be more active from dusk to dawn when living in close proximity to people. Even in populated areas, nature typically provides ample food. Mice, deer, voles, rabbits, raccoons, fruit and goose eggs can be part of a coyote’s diet.

“Coyotes typically shy away from human activity but they may take advantage of food around homes if natural prey is limiting, a coyote is injured or sick, or young have not learned to hunt effectively,” Palmer said.

Coyotes can lose their fear of humans if conditioned to depend on people for food, and conflicts can arise from people feeding them – either intentionally or unintentionally.

“Do not leave pet food outside and make sure garbage is secured,” Palmer said. “Discourage your neighbors from feeding feral cats, raccoons or coyotes themselves.”

She also recommends bringing bird feeders inside at night and removing seed that has fallen on the ground. Bird feeders attract animals that in turn attract coyotes. Plug any holes under fences, block access to crawl spaces and fence around gardens. Motion-activated lighting around the house can act as a coyote deterrent.

Also, consider turning on outside lights and checking the yard for unwanted animals before letting a dog outside at night.

If you are concerned about pets being outside, keep them inside or kennel them when they are unattended, if possible. When walking a dog, use a short, non-retractable leash that is highly visible and vary your walking routine.

A coyote that does not flee upon encountering a person could be sick, injured or habituated to people. Do not panic if you see a coyote or one approaches you, Palmer said.

For more outdoors news and information, see Art Lander’s Outdoors on KyForward.

Coyotes are curious by nature and sometimes follow people or dogs to see what they are doing in their territories or to see that they do not get too close to their dens and pups, she said.

Other suggestions: Don’t approach a coyote or linger to snap photos or take video. Don’t turn your back on a coyote and don’t run. Running away can diminish the coyote’s fear of people and may trigger its chase instinct.

Don’t harass a coyote if it is cornered, with pups or seems sick or injured. It’s best to back away slowly or try to scare it away with loud noises. Make yourself look bigger by waving your arms, widening your stance or waving a stick. Take a step or lunge toward the coyote to establish dominance.

Throw a rock or a stick in its direction but not directly at it. Pick up small dogs and children. Keep scaring the coyote until it’s out of sight. It’s also a good idea to teach children to recognize coyotes, never approach one and scare them away.

If you happen upon what you suspect is a den, like a hollow tree or brush pile, slowly back away and leave the area. Coyotes are protective of their pups, which stay in the den with the mother for about three weeks and learn to hunt when they are eight to 12 weeks old. Family groups typically break up and disperse in late summer and early fall.

Understanding coyotes can reduce potential conflicts with them.

If your community has a Facebook page, consider sharing tips for coexisting with coyotes and deterring these animals from becoming too bold. One resource Palmer recommends is the website urbancoyoteresearch.com. Kentucky Fish and Wildlife’s website at fw.ky.gov also offers helpful information.

 


Kevin Kelly is a writer for Kentucky Afield magazine, the official publication of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. An avid angler with a passion for muskellunge and stream fishing, his journalism career has included stops at daily newspapers in Cincinnati, St. Petersburg, Fla., and Charleston, S.C. Get the latest from Kelly and the entire Kentucky Afield staff by following them on Twitter: @kyafield.

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources manages, regulates, enforces and promotes responsible use of all fish and wildlife species, their habitats, public wildlife areas and waterways for the benefit of those resources and for public enjoyment. Kentucky Fish and Wildlife is an agency of the Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet. For more information on the department, click here.

 

 

Congrats to Lafe Hinle, left and Grant Marcum for their Top Five finish in the Ky. State Bass Fishing Tournament at Kentucky Lake over the weekend. Congrats to Lafe Hinle, left and Grant Marcum for their Top Five finish in the Ky. State Bass Fishing Tournament at Kentucky Lake over the weekend.


Congrats to the Cardinal Bass Fishermen on an awesome finish in the state competition! The team of Grant Marcum & Lafe Messer finished 5th with a weight of 32.7.  Matt Messer & Braxton Maynard were 26th with 24.11. MCMS's Cameron Dials and Keaton Meade were 40th with 19.3.

In addition to being amazing fishermen, Marcum and Messer are both members of the SCHS Journalism Class and we are CARDINAL PROUD!!

---Sheldon Clark High School Journalism

 

HAPPY SPRING!

 Eagle Ridge golf courseEagle Ridge golf course

Men's League will kick off on Tuesday April 18th at 5:30 p.m. Annual League Fee, $25.00

Ladies Clinics begin Tuesdays in May!!

Cost: $15.00 per clinic

Dates:  May 2, 9, 16, 23, 30

            June 6, 13, 20, 27

Time:  6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

All skill levels are invited to participate!!! We will learn the game from the green back to the tee! and have some fun too!!

???Question???

I have several ladies that would like to get together one night a week to play for FUN! Maybe a Monday night or Thursday night, 5:00 or 6:00, 9 holes.  I am trying to get an idea if anyone else is interested.  This is not a major organized event!  Just a chance for ladies in our area to come out and play golf. Please let me know!! You may email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.! thank you!!

Junior Clinics begin in May!!

Cost:  $10.00 per junior per clinic

Dates:  Sundays in May

            7, 14, 21, 28

Time:  2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Ages 7 to 12

  • Looking for a discount?  Book your tee time through GolfNow and you are guaranteed a discounted rate!  Don't forget about our discount days:  Military Monday, Hometown Day Wednesday, Senior Day Thursday and Family Day Saturday- Discount Days, play for $25.00.  
  • 2017 Season passes are available.  You may purchase them from the golf pro shop. AND they are good at ANY State Park Golf Course!!

Upcoming Golf Outings: 9:00 a.m. Shotgun Start

*April Golf Outings:

Saturday April 15 - LCHS Basketball

Friday April 28 - Louisa Rotary Club

*May Golf Outings:

Saturday May 6 - Trinity Christian Academy

Saturday May 20 - Team Tenley

Saturday May 27 - Big Hurricane Church

*June Golf Outings:

Friday June 2 - FCI Big Sandy Prison 

Saturday June 17 - Louisa United Methodist Church 

June 24 - Peter's Chapel Church

*  ...please note that on golf outing days unless there are more than 15 groups the golf course IS NOT CLOSED TO REGULAR PLAY.  (golf course is closed for outings with 16+ groups).  All golf outings are shotgun start using a pre-determined number of holes.  We encourage you to play in our hosted golf outings OR just come on out and play like normal! There is always a hole to start on!! 

April Hours of Operation

8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Last tee time, 5:30 p.m.

All carts in by 7:45 p.m.

Follow us on Facebook!!  Eagle Ridge Golf Course at Yatesville Lake State Park

See you at the course!

Missy Kennedy,

PGA Head Golf Professional/Park Manager

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Eagle Ridge Golf Course

Yatesville Lake State Park

(606) 673-4300 Golf Pro Shop

(606) 673-1492 Business Office

(606) 673-4301 fax

Kentucky State Parks - Create your own Experience!

www.parks.ky.gov