The area's leading online source for news!
Louisa-Lawrence Co, KY

In God We Trust - Established 2008

Menu

 

It's SUMMER!

I just wanted to update everyone of the "happenings" here on the Ridge!!!

 Golf Outing Schedule

Eagle Ridge Golf Course

9:00 a.m. Shotgun Start  

Saturday, June 4 – Harper’s Hope 

Saturday, June 11 – LC Middle School Cheer 

Saturday, June 18 – Louisa Methodist Church 

Saturday, June 25 – Friends of Yatesville Lake

Summer Junior Clinics
Thursdays in June & July

June 2, 9, 16, 23, 30

July 7, 14, 21, 28

Ages 4 to 6, 9:00 a.m. to 9:55 a.m.

Ages 7 to 11, 10:00 a.m. to 10:55 a.m.

Ages 12 to 17, 11:00 a.m. to 11:55 a.m.

cost:  $10.00 per jr/clinic

Ladies Clinics in June
Tuesdays, 7, 14, 21, 28

6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

cost: $15.00

June topics: full swing and on the course

SPECIAL DAYS!!!
MILITARY MONDAY-MONDAY ONLY, MUST SHOW MILITARY ID

$25.00, UNTIL 4:00 P.M. (TWILIGHT)

HOMETOWN DAY-WEDNESDAY ONLY, MUST SHOW PROOF OR WORKING OR LIVING IN WAYNE OR LAWRENCE CO.

$25.00, UNTIL 4:00 P.M. (TWILIGHT)

SENIOR DAY-THURSDAY ONLY, AGES 62+

$25.00, UNTIL 4:00 P.M. (TWILIGHT)

FAMILY DAY-SATURDAY ONLY, ADULT MUST BE PLAYING WITH A PLAYING JR. GOLFER AGE 17 OR YOUNGER, LIMIT OF 1 ADULT PER JUNIOR.

$25.00, 1:00 P.M. UNTIL 4:00 P.M. (TWILIGHT)

***The $25.00 Golf Card is available.  Purchase a discount card for $25.00 and receive reduced rates on four rounds of golf/cart and your fifth round is FREE.  This is over a $50.00 savings!!  WITH NO EXPIRATION DATE.  This card is only valid at Eagle Ridge Golf Course.

June Pro Shop Hours:

Monday - Friday,  8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday, 7:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m
Last tee time is 6:30 p.m.
Golf Carts must be returned to the parking lot by 8:30 p.m.

**FOLLOW THE GOLF COURSE AND ALL OF YATESVILLE LAKE STATE PARK ON FACEBOOK.

YOU CAN FIND US AT, EAGLE RIDGE GOLF COURSE AT YATESVILLE LAKE STATE PARK

Thank you! and see you at the course!!!

Missy Kennedy, PGA Head Golf Professional/Park Manager

 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Eagle Ridge Golf Course

Yatesville Lake State Park

(606) 673-1492 business office

(606) 673-4300 golfcourse

(606) 673-4301 fax

Kentucky State Parks - Create your own Experience!

www.parks.ky.gov

Kentucky Afield Outdoors: Always ready for a fight, catfish readily available in state waters

By Kevin Kelly
Special to KyForward

(This is the ninth and final installment of the “Spring Fishing Fever” series of articles, detailing productive fishing techniques and opportunities across Kentucky. An archive of past articles is available on the department’s website at www.fw.ky.gov).

Prized for their fight and flavor, catfish are readily available in Kentucky waters and can be caught on a wide assortment of baits.

A gob of nightcrawlers, cut bait, commercial stink bait, hot dogs, uncooked shell-on shrimp or scraps of chicken marinated in strawberry-flavored drink mix have all proven capable of enticing catfish into biting.

And late spring into early summer is a great time to cater to them.

“It’s prime time to be catching channel catfish,” said Paul Rister, Western Fisheries District biologist for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

The department stocks blue catfish and channel catfish but generally doesn’t stock flathead catfish, although the species is present in a number of lakes and rivers across the state. The annual Fishing Forecast, available on the department’s website at fw.ky.gov, details spots where anglers can find each of these species.

Julie Ann Campbell, mother of Zac Campbell, boating education coordinator for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, holds a huge blue catfish caught in early May from a small lake in Shelby County. May and June are two of the best months of the year to catch channel and blue catfish (F&W Photo)

“Kentucky offers a ton of really good areas for catfish,” said Chad Miles, host of the weekly show Kentucky Afield.

The big twins of west Kentucky – Kentucky Lake and Lake Barkley – are among the finest. Both offer opportunities to catch large blue and channel catfish.
Channel catfish are distinguished by a rounded anal fin and small black spots on the sides of the body. As water temperatures climb into 70s, they feed aggressively and heed the spawning instinct.

“I’ve heard of people fishing bluegill and redear fishing who just start catching catfish and change over to a little bit heavier tackle,” Rister said.

An angler fishing from the bank after work recently at a small central Kentucky lake cast a traditional bobber rig baited with a chunk of shad-scented dough pressed onto a treble hook. The float splashed down and the business end of the rig descended with the help of a pinch of split shot. In no time, a trophy channel catfish gobbled the bait and pulled the bobber beneath the surface.

Other casts produced similar results, and the angler returned to his truck before sunset with three quality catfish destined for the dinner table and freezer.

At Kentucky and Barkley lakes, Rister points anglers toward shallow embayments and areas of shoreline with rip rap or big chunk rocks for channel catfish.

A night crawler fished on the bottom with a slip sinker rig is a popular presentation. To assemble the rig, tie a 4/0 circle hook onto an 18-inch fluorocarbon or monofilament leader. Tie a barrel swivel onto the other end of the leader, then take the main line and thread it through a ½- to ¾-ounce egg sinker and plastic bead before tying the line to the other eyelet of the barrel swivel.

“Channel catfish often prefer a night crawler presentation closer to the bottom but they will take something while you’re trying to redear fish, which is typically close to the bottom, or even come up to get a crappie jig,” Rister said.

The 40 lakes that comprise the Fishing in Neighborhoods (FINs) program provide opportunities to catch catfish in a smaller setting.

For more outdoors news and information, see Art Lander’s Outdoors on KyForward.

Kentucky Fish and Wildlife plans to stock more than 115,000 catfish in its FINs lakes this year. The stocking schedule is available on Kentucky Fish and Wildlife’s website. More than two dozen FINs lakes are scheduled to receive stockings of hybrid catfish – a faster growing cross of blue and channel catfish – this month.

Populations of blue catfish have been established in several small lakes and four major reservoirs – Barren River Lake in Allen and Barren counties, Dewey Lake in Floyd County, Fishtrap Lake in Pike County and Taylorsville Lake in Spencer, Anderson and Nelson counties – in recent years.

For blue catfish at Kentucky and Barkley lakes, Rister recommends targeting the areas where creek mouths meet the river channel with nightcrawlers, skipjack or small shad, cheese baits, stink baits or chicken livers.

“Later in the summer when they get a little more active out on the main river channels, try either shad, cut bait or night crawlers,” Rister said. “A lot of times what I’ll have to do is graph some and look for the fish. If there’s not much current, they’re typically closer to the bottom. If they’re pulling some current, it seems to pull the fish more up on the ledges. So you may just be fishing more for suspended fish.”

A slip bobber rig can be an effective presentation for suspended catfish. To assemble this rig, tie a 4/0 octopus-style hook onto a 12- to 18-inch fluorocarbon or monofilament leader. Tie a barrel swivel onto the other end of the leader, then take the main line and thread it through a bobber stop, a plastic bead, the slip bobber, a sinker and another plastic bead before tying the line to the other eyelet of the barrel swivel. The sinker should not be so heavy that it sinks the bobber. Slide the bobber stop up or down to the desired fishing depth.

Anglers interested in learning more about how to catch catfish and some of the unique baits that can work for them should consider tuning in to the June 4 episode of “Kentucky Afield” on Kentucky Educational Television (KET). In one segment, Miles meets up with Jim Wise at a Shelby County farm pond. They catch catfish and other species using Wise’s homemade baits.

“Kentucky Afield” airs at 8:30 p.m. ET Saturdays and 4:30 p.m. Sundays.

K Kelly 1

Kevin Kelly is a writer for Kentucky Afield magazine, the official publication of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. An avid angler with a passion for muskellunge and stream fishing, his journalism career has included stops at daily newspapers in Cincinnati, St. Petersburg, Fla., and Charleston, S.C. Get the latest from Kelly and the entire Kentucky Afield staff by following them on Twitter: @kyafield.

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources manages, regulates, enforces and promotes responsible use of all fish and wildlife species, their habitats, public wildlife areas and waterways for the benefit of those resources and for public enjoyment. Kentucky Fish and Wildlife is an agency of the Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet. For more information on the department, click here.

Kentucky Afield Outdoors: With weather conditions stablizing, state fishing approaching optimal level

Special to KyForward

(This is the seventh installment of the “Spring Fishing Fever” series of articles, detailing productive fishing techniques and opportunities across Kentucky. The series will continue until early summer. An archive of past articles is available on the department’s website).

An extended stretch of stable weather and seasonably warm temperatures in late April created optimal spring fishing conditions for anglers across Kentucky.

The calm broke at the end of the month when rounds of storms over a period of days preceded a cold front. In their wake, rivers and streams that had been running low and clear and warmer than normal rose and cooled off a bit.

“This is just going to be a quick pulse,” said Mike Hardin, assistant director of fisheries for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. “On a falling river, I’d hit the feeder creeks. You’ll have a better chance of finding fish there because of the difference in water quality and clarity. When stable patterns return, fish will start returning to the main river and below locks and dams.”

Ryan Kausing, fisheries technician for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, holds two huge smallmouth bass captured and released during population sampling on the South Fork of Kentucky River a few weeks ago. May is an incredibly productive month to fish rivers across Kentucky (F&W Photo)

 

Increased streamflow can prolong spawning activity for some fish species such as largemouth bass. Due to the recent warm weather, catfish already were on the verge of starting their spawning rituals in smaller creeks.

“It’s been so pleasant this spring that we’re likely to see early spawning by catfish,” Hardin said. “I’ve already seen channel catfish in Elkhorn Creek paired up and full of eggs while smallmouth bass were guarding fry along nearby banks.”

Also look for white bass and hybrids below some of the dams. The Ohio River is highly rated for its hybrid striped bass and channel catfish. Those in search of largemouth bass and crappie on the river in the coming weeks should key on embayments.

“As far as somebody looking to go out and have a really good day, I would suggest the Markland Pool, and point people toward the embayments like Craigs Creek, Gunpowder Creek and Woolper Creek,” said Jay Herrala, Big Rivers Research Branch biologist with Kentucky Fish and Wildlife. “Woolper Creek this past fall looked absolutely amazing.”

Largemouth bass anglers would do well to focus on spots that lead to spawning areas – deeper points and the deeper stretches of banks that lead into the embayments – and work back from there. Crawdad imitations, jig and trailer combinations, square-billed crankbaits, weightless flukes and Texas or Carolina-rigged lizards all can draw strikes. Also, save room in a stowaway box for topwater lures such as Zara Spooks, Pop-Rs and buzzbaits.

Herrala recommends the lower ends of pools for largemouth. “You can pick up some pretty nice spots here and there as well,” he said.

For crappie, consider drifting live minnows below bobbers in areas with good structure. A 2-inch white or black and chartreuse 1/8- or 1/16-ounce tube jig tipped with live minnows or a soft plastic grub also can entice bites.

“Late in the spring, if those crappie don’t pull out into the river and that water starts to set up like a lake, you could probably troll some small crankbaits and maybe catch a few as well,” Herrala said.

Silt-free embayments and rocky habitat are good places to target channel catfish with nightcrawlers, chicken livers, cut pieces of shad or skipjack herring, shrimp and scented dough baits.

Recent sampling of the South Fork of Kentucky River from the Oneida boat ramp in Clay County to the Kay Wood Road access near Booneville in Owsley County produced impressive results for channel catfish and other species.

“I was absolutely blown away with it,” Herrala said. “Catch rates for smallmouth bass were probably somewhere in the Green River to Elkhorn Creek range. It was phenomenal. Channel catfish looked great. Muskie numbers were good and they were in excellent physical condition.”

Smallmouth bass can be found in tailwater areas but also along outside bends with rocky habitat. A 3-inch plastic tube, 4-inch salty lizard or 3-inch Senko-style worm in green pumpkin or smoke fished on a 1/8-ounce lead head is a tried and true presentation. As water temperatures crest 70 degrees, topwater baits are worth trying in low-light conditions.

Like the South Fork of Kentucky River, the Barren River from the dam at Barren River Lake downstream to Lock and Dam 1 at Greencastle offers an opportunity to encounter muskellunge. As with any stream that holds a population of these fish, target the mouths of feeder creeks – and the creeks themselves – as well as areas around woody structure and current breaks.

“You also need to be aware of temperature differential,” Hardin said. “Think about what you’re fishing for and look at your temperatures. If you’re looking at tributaries and the river is the same temperature, fish can be anywhere.”

For more outdoors news and information, see Art Lander’s Outdoors on KyForward.

A dressed in-line spinner or spinnerbait, 4- to 7-inch balsa wood crankbait and a 1/4-ounce skirted buzz bait are essentials. A 7-foot medium-heavy to heavy action rod, baitcaster reel rated for 40- to 80-pound braided line tipped fortified with a steel leader will be up to the task.

Tailwater areas and locks and dams can attract muskie but also white, hybrid and striped bass and catfish. Good to excellent white bass fishing was expected in the Barren River Lake tailwater this year. Small curly tailed jigs and in-line spinners are proven producers.

It’s understandable for anglers who normally fish lakes and reservoirs to feel out of their element fishing a river.
“It’s a lot of trusting your instincts,” Herrala assured.

Kentucky Fish and Wildlife offers some helpful resources on its website at fw.ky.gov. The department’s annual Fishing Forecast offers a snapshot of Kentucky’s major fisheries. The listing rates each species and offers tips about where and how to fish for them. Visitors to the department’s website also will find a complete listing of fishing and boating access sites by clicking on the “Fish” tab on the homepage and choosing “Where to Fish” from the dropdown menu.

Another important resource for bank anglers and paddlers alike is the U.S. Geological Survey’s streamflow conditions web page. It provides up-to-date information and is available at www.usgs.gov/water.

Outfitted with that information, all that’s left to do is to give it a try before spring turns to summer.

K Kelly 1

Kevin Kelly is a writer for Kentucky Afield magazine, the official publication of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. An avid angler with a passion for muskellunge and stream fishing, his journalism career has included stops at daily newspapers in Cincinnati, St. Petersburg, Fla., and Charleston, S.C. Get the latest from Kelly and the entire Kentucky Afield staff by following them on Twitter: @kyafield.

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources manages, regulates, enforces and promotes responsible use of all fish and wildlife species, their habitats, public wildlife areas and waterways for the benefit of those resources and for public enjoyment. Kentucky Fish and Wildlife is an agency of the Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet. For more information on the department, click here.

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Freshwater drum a largely overlooked species in Kentucky’s rivers and streams

Sheephead, white perch, gasper goo.

These are a few of the common names for the freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens), a fish species present throughout most major river drainages in Kentucky, yet overlooked by many anglers.

Most catches are made incidentally, while fishing for catfish, sauger or black bass. The freshwater drum is the Rodney Dangerfield of Kentucky’s native fishes, a reference to the late stand-up comedian who was best known for the punch line “I don’t get no respect.”

As tablefare, the freshwater drum is seriously underrated. Its fillets are large, thick, and boneless. Trim away the lateral line and any dark bits of flesh. When batter fried, chunks cook up to a tender, flaky consistency reminiscent of cod, with a mild, pleasing flavor (Photo by Art Lander Jr.)

 

But many anglers may beg to differ. On light tackle, the freshwater drum is known for bulldog runs — it’s flat, tall body and wide dorsal and tail fins working with river currents to fight with dogged determination.

As tablefare, the freshwater drum is seriously underrated. Its fillets are large, thick, and boneless. Trim away the lateral line and any dark bits of flesh. When batter fried, chunks cook up to a tender, flaky consistency reminiscent of cod, with a mild, pleasing flavor.

Distribution and Biology

According to The Fishes of Kentucky, by William M. Clay, the freshwater drum is present in most of Kentucky’s river and large streams, although least abundant in the high-gradient streams of the Appalachian Plateau, in the eastern one-fourth of the state.

The freshwater drum is also present in many of Kentucky’s major lakes, and is abundant in Kentucky Lake and Lake Barkley, main stem reservoirs of the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers, in far western Kentucky.

The freshwater drum’s geographic range extends from Guatemala northward through the Mississippi and Ohio Valleys to the Great Lakes (although absent from Lake Superior), eastward to Quebec and as far west in Canada as southeastern Saskatchewan. A silvery, deep-bodied fish, the head and body slope upward from the snout to the dorsal fins and give the fish a distinct humpbacked appearance.

The lips are milky white, and the pelvic fins are white, often tinged with orange. The dorsal fin is long and is divided into two distinct parts.

Typical catches are two to four pounds, but the freshwater drum can grow to enormous size.

Kentucky’s state record freshwater drum weighed 38 pounds and was caught from the Green River on June 5, 1980 by Larry Cardwell, of Morgantown, Kentucky.

For more outdoors news and information, see Art Lander’s Outdoors on KyForward.

Usually found on shallow sandy or mixed mud-and-sand bottomed stretches of large rivers, the freshwater drum can be caught as deep as 30 feet in rivers with larger pools.

Long thought to be a mollusk eater, because of its heavy “throat teeth,” this species actually eats mainly fish, crayfish, and immature aquatic insects. Microcrustaceans and zooplankton are the foods of larval drum, which can also feed on other fish fry because of their unusually large mouths and their ability to roll the ingested fry into a ball.

The freshwater drum is harvested both commercially and as a sport fish, but is considered a rough fish, so there’s no creel or size limits in Kentucky. Individuals can live for 13 years. A member of family Sciaenidae, drums get their name from the grunting, croaking, or “drumming” sound they make using specialized muscles associated with the swim bladder. In this species, the sound is thought to be used in mating activities.

Freshwater drums have “rocks” in their heads.

Native Americans used the otoliths (ear bones) as jewelry. Anglers cut these “lucky stones” from the fish they catch as keepsakes.

In large rivers, such as the Kentucky River, where the freshwater drum is particularly abundant, fish below dams, on sloping banks.

Casting deep-diving crankbaits, or blade baits, will catch drum, but drifting live minnows on bottom rigs is the best bet since the bait must be close to the bottom to get a strike.

Overlooked and under appreciated, the freshwater drum is easy to find, easy to catch and surprisingly good tablefare. Fishing is at its best in late spring and summer, when water conditions are stable.

1Art Lander Jr.

Art Lander Jr. is outdoors editor for KyForward. He is a native Kentuckian, a graduate of Western Kentucky University and a life-long hunter, angler, gardener and nature enthusiast. He has worked as a newspaper columnist, magazine journalist and author and is a former staff writer for Kentucky Afield Magazine, editor of the annual Kentucky Hunting & Trapping Guide and Kentucky Spring Hunting Guide, and co-writer of the Kentucky Afield Outdoors newspaper column.

 

Happy May!!

 

I just wanted to update everyone of the "happenings" here on the Ridge!!!

Spring Golf Outing Schedule

Eagle Ridge Golf Course

9:00 a.m. Shotgun Start 

Saturday, May 14 – Rotary Club 

Friday, May 20 – Federal Prison 

Saturday, May 21 – LCHS Basketball 

Saturday, May 28 – Big Hurricane Miss. Baptist Church 

Saturday, June 4 – Harper’s Hope 

Saturday, June 11 – LC Middle School Cheer 

Saturday, June 18 – Louisa Methodist Church 

Saturday, June 25 – Friends of Yatesville Lake

 

Spring Junior Clinics in May

Sundays, 15, 22, 29

2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

cost:  $10.00 per jr/clinic
ages 6 to 11

Ladies Clinics in May

Tuesdays, 10, 17, 24, 31

6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

cost: $15.00

May topics: full swing and short game

SPECIAL DAYS!!!

MILITARY MONDAY-MONDAY ONLY, MUST SHOW MILITARY ID

$25.00, UNTIL 4:00 P.M. (TWILIGHT)

HOMETOWN DAY-WEDNESDAY ONLY, MUST SHOW PROOF OR WORKING OR LIVING IN WAYNE OR LAWRENCE CO.

$25.00, UNTIL 4:00 P.M. (TWILIGHT)

SENIOR DAY-THURSDAY ONLY, AGES 62+

$25.00, UNTIL 4:00 P.M. (TWILIGHT)

FAMILY DAY-SATURDAY ONLY, ADULT MUST BE PLAYING WITH A PLAYING JR. GOLFER AGE 17 OR YOUNGER, LIMIT OF 1 ADULT PER JUNIOR.

$25.00, 1:00 P.M. UNTIL 4:00 P.M. (TWILIGHT)

***The $25.00 Golf Card is available.  Purchase a discount card for $25.00 and receive reduced rates on four rounds of golf/cart and your fifth round is FREE.  This is over a $50.00 savings!!  WITH NO EXPIRATION DATE.  This card is only valid at Eagle Ridge Golf Course.

MAY Pro Shop Hours:

Sunday to Saturday, 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
(Memorial Day, first tee time 7:30 a.m.)
Last tee time is 6:30 p.m.
Golf Carts must be returned to the parking lot by 8:15 p.m.
(**this time will be extended based on sunset time)

Thank you! and see you at the course!!!

Missy Kennedy, PGA Head Golf Professional/Park Manager

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Eagle Ridge Golf Course

Yatesville Lake State Park

(606) 673-1492 business office

(606) 673-4300 golfcourse

(606) 673-4301 fax

Kentucky State Parks - Create your own Experience!

www.parks.ky.gov