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New 72,000 square foot Lexington Cabela’s outdoors store

Cabela’s announced plans to celebrate the official grand opening of its new Lexington, Ky., store on Wednesday, March 16, with a unique ribbon-cutting ceremony followed by a weekend-long celebration featuring giveaways, family activities, guest appearances and more.

The ribbon-cutting ceremony, hosted by Cabela’s executives and special guests, will begin at 9:45 a.m. and conclude with the grand-opening ribbon being cut by an arrow shot from a bow by a local Cabela’s employee.

Doors will open for business at 10 a.m.

The 72,000-square-foot store is located at 1510 Conservation Way in the new Hamburg Place II retail development on Polo Club Boulevard near the intersection of Interstate 75 and Man O' War Boulevard. It will be Cabela’s third location in Kentucky, joining stores in Louisville and Bowling Green (Photo Provided)

The 72,000-square-foot store is located at 1510 Conservation Way in the new Hamburg Place II retail development on Polo Club Boulevard near the intersection of Interstate 75 and Man O’ War Boulevard. It will be Cabela’s third location in Kentucky, joining stores in Louisville andBowling Green 

Opening day will kick off an exciting weekend-long celebration highlighted by special appearances, family events, giveaways, sales and more. A complete schedule of events will be available on www.cabelas.com/stores when finalized.

The 72,000-square-foot store is located at 1510 Conservation Way in the new Hamburg Place II retail development on Polo Club Boulevard near the intersection of Interstate 75 and Man O’ War Boulevard. It will be Cabela’s third location in Kentucky, joining stores in Louisville and Bowling Green.

The store is being built in Cabela’s new-format layout, designed to offer customers an immersive outdoor experience with wood construction, stonework, dozens of wildlife displays and museum-quality taxidermy mounts, vintage outdoor photos and memorabilia, hand-painted murals, an aquarium and an indoor archery range. Additionally, the store will include an express cafe, Gun Library and Bargain Cave, along with thousands of quality outdoor products.

Cabela’s has employed approximately 160 full-time, part-time and seasonal employees to staff the location, most coming from Lexington and the surrounding area. Throughout the year, the staff will host educational seminars and demonstrations, offering tips and insights on outdoor products and seasonal activities.

Cabela’s Incorporated, the World’s Foremost Outfitter of hunting, fishing and outdoor gear, began as a kitchen-table dream in the home of founders Dick and Mary Cabela in 1961.

The company is now famous for its strong brand and world-renowned reputation for delivering quality merchandise, value and legendary customer service. Cabela’s also issues the Cabela’s CLUB Visa credit card, which serves as its primary customer loyalty rewards program.

From Cabela’s Communications

Eagle Ridge Golf Course Yatesville State Park 5 24 2010

We are going to let the course dry out the next two day and plan on opening on Saturday, Feb. 6th.  Looks like we may have frost so please call ahead to check course opening time.  We will be CART PATH ONLY.

Thanks!

See you at the course!

 

Missy Kennedy, PGA Head Golf Professional/Park Manager

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Eagle Ridge Golf Course

Yatesville Lake State Park

(606) 673-1492 business office

(606) 673-4300 golfcourse

(606) 673-4301 fax

JANUARY 16, 2016

Ryan Ruffels, a 17-year-old Australian, is turning professional and is already ahead of the game, courtesy of taking $5,000 off Phil Mickelson on the golf course. “We get on the first tee, it’s pretty early in the morning and he says, ‘I don't wake up this early to play for any less than $2500," Ruffels said in this story by Matt Murnane of the Sydney Morning Herald.

Mickelson made him a deal, that if Ruffels won, Mickelson would give him $5,000, but if Mickelson won, Ruffels would owe him $2,500 once he turned pro. “I was a few down through nine but then I birdied six of my last seven to win by one shot and took his money, so that was pretty cool,” Ruffels said. Ruffels will make his professional debut on the PGA Tour debut at the Farmers Insurance Open.

Ryan Ruffels
Getty Images

Ryan Ruffels, playing in the RBC Canadian Open as an amateur last summer.

“There's cruel irony in that the hardest part comes on the golf course. That's where Billy Hurley III most often thinks about his father, because that's where they spent the most time together,” Jason Sobel of ESPN writes. Hurley’s father committed suicide in August.

“The Europe players did not require being introduced one by one to the Queen of Malaysia here on Thursday to take the EurAsia Cup seriously. Their captain has been drumming it into them all week,” James Corrigan of the Telegraph writes. “In the team room, [European captain] Darren Clarke has informed his 12 professionals and their caddies that defeat by Asia in this three-day match is not on the agenda, and when sitting down with the Ulsterman here at Glenmarie Golf Club it became clear that he has put everything into his first experience of captaincy. Indeed, never mind a Ryder Cup dress rehearsal, this could be described as a stress rehearsal.”

JANUARY 25, 2016

Newly fallen snow has a way of awakening the spirit of adventure in kids and grown-ups alike. It’s also nature’s tattletale.

As such, a fresh blanket of snow opens a window to new discoveries by revealing which animals inhabit the landscape around us and how they use it during the winter months.

Animal tracking in the snow exercises the body and mind, and it can be fun for the entire family.

Laura Palmer, furbearer biologist with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, suggests carrying a guide to animal tracks as well as a ruler that will show up clearly in photographs. A basic pocket guide to animal tracks may be printed from the department’s website at fw.ky.gov.

Outdoors enthusiasts don't have to go stir crazy from being cooped up after a major snow blankets Kentucky. Identifying wildlife by the tracks they leave is a fun activity after a snowfall as is looking for the antlers male deer shed from December through March (F&W Photo)

Outdoors enthusiasts don’t have to go stir crazy from being cooped up

 

after a major snow blankets Kentucky. Identifying wildlife by the tracks

 

they leave is a fun activity after a snowfall as is looking for the antlers

 

male deer shed from December through March (F&W Photo)

When you find a track, take note of the shape, number of toes, the presence or absence of claw marks, the shape of the heel pad and the length of the animal’s stride. Keep a journal for personal reference and comparisons.

“Animal tracking does not only include looking for animal tracks,” Palmer said. “There are many other signs that animals leave to let you know they are in the area: bear scratches on trees, squirrels stripping bark from trees for nest building, deer rubs, scat, slides made by a river otter or beaver, fresh vegetation cut around a pond and stems left in water from muskrat.”

Observing wildlife and their movements provides clues about their habits, where they den or bed, what they eat and whether the animal travels by hopping, bounding or striding, she said.

As an added bonus, the exploration of animal tracks can lead to unexpected discoveries.

Newly fallen snow helps make antlers shed by deer easier to see. Male deer may drop their antlers any time from November to May, but the peak period stretches from late December through early March.

For hunters, antler size provides insight into the number and quality of bucks that made it through the hunting seasons. Deer tracks also reveal what deer eat when food is scarce as well as travel corridors and bedding areas.

“Movement is going to be different in winter than it is in the fall but the more you know about how deer move around a piece of property, the more effective that makes you,” said David Yancy, deer biologist with Kentucky Fish and Wildlife. “That’s information that you can file away for later.”

For more outdoors news and information, see Art Lander’s Outdoors on KyForward.

Archery deer season ended Jan. 18, closing the book on a record-setting deer season overall in Kentucky, but other opportunities for small game and furbearers remain available. Consult the Kentucky Hunting and Trapping Guide or Kentucky Fish and Wildlife’s website for season dates.

Some grouse hunters like the snow because it helps close the gap on the elusive birds. Squirrels also will remain active with snow on the ground.

“Snow can make quail hunting difficult because they’ll try to wait it out as long as they can,” said Ben Robinson, small game biologist with Kentucky Fish and Wildlife. “If you’ve got a lot of snow on the ground, birds are probably not going to be just out walking around in fields because that exposes them to predation.

“If you target thick, woody cover like fence rows and brush piles and shrub thickets, you have a better chance of finding some birds. The same could be said for rabbits as well.”

Some state parks host opportunities to view wildlife from January into March. Offerings include bald eagle, elk and sandhill crane viewing tours. More information about those opportunities is available at parks.ky.gov.

Kentucky Fish and Wildlife also provides on its website a listing of wildlife viewing sites at various wildlife management areas across the state.

There is more to the snow than snowmen, racing sleds downhill or shoveling driveways. Take the opportunity to get a close-up look at what often goes unseen in nature.

K Kelly 1

Kevin Kelly is a writer for Kentucky Afield magazine, the official publication of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. An avid angler with a passion for muskellunge and stream fishing, his journalism career has included stops at daily newspapers in Cincinnati, St. Petersburg, Fla., and Charleston, S.C. Get the latest from Kelly and the entire Kentucky Afield staff by following them on Twitter: @kyafield.

The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources manages, regulates, enforces and promotes responsible use of all fish and wildlife species, their habitats, public wildlife areas and waterways for the benefit of those resources and for public enjoyment. Kentucky Fish and Wildlife is an agency of the Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet. For more information on the department, click here.

By Kevin Kelly
Special to KyForward

JANUARY 13, 2016

Art Lander’s Outdoors: Latest archery equipment showcased at Archery Trade Association Show

LOUISVILLE — The latest archery equipment was showcased in Louisville Jan. 5-7 at the annual Archery Trade Association (ATA) Show. Open to archery manufacturers, retailers and the outdoors media, this year’s show was one of the largest ever, with about 620 exhibitors.

After four hours spent walking through the show, here’s some products that caught my eye:

* The Ignite may be Hoyt’s most versatile bow, ideal for the beginner or growing youth archer. This is because the draw length can be adjusted from 19 to 30 inches, and the draw weight range from 15 pounds to 70 pounds.

It’s a great bow for a teenager, or someone just getting into archery, who is learning shooting form. A growing youngster will be able to shoot this bow into adulthood by increasing the draw length.

The Hoyt Ignite is a versatile bow, ideal for a growing youth archer because the draw length and draw weight are adjustable. A growing youngster will be able to shoot this bow into adulthood (Photo Provided)

The Hoyt Ignite is a versatile bow,

 

ideal for a growing youth archer

 

because the draw length and draw

 

weight are adjustable. A growing

 

youngster will be able to shoot this

 

bow into adulthood (Photo Provided)

As familiarity with shooting increases and arm strength grows, the poundage can be increased. The wide draw weight range also comes in handy for the two-season archer. Just crank down the poundage for summer bow fishing.

The Ignite weighs just 3.6 pounds, has parallel split limbs, is 28 inches axle-to-axle and is available in several colors and camouflage patterns. Its generous eight-inch brace height ensures plenty of arm clearance and shooting forgiveness.

It’s value-priced too, at $399. For more details visit:http://hoyt.com/compounds/ignite.

* For nearly 20 years Steve Simms has taken a “no compromise” attitude towards archery accessories. His Limbsaver brand stabilizers are an industry leader in dampening bow noise, hand shock, bow jump and vibration.

New this year is the LS Hunter Pro, a fully customizable stabilizer made from carbon fiber tubing, machined aluminum and Limbsaver’s proprietary Navcom material.

The LS Hunter Pro comes in several lengths and colors (black and the most popular camouflage patterns), and includes two, two-ounce weights, to customize the forward balance of your bow by adding weight to the end of the stabilizer.

The 9-1/2-inch model weighs 6.2 ounces, and sells for about $70. For more details visit:http://www.limbsaver.com/product/ls-hunter-pro-bow-stabilizer/.

* Quality Archery Designs, of Madison Heights, Va., has been producing drop-away arrow rests since 1992. Their Ultrarest HXD, which sells for about $140, is an industry leader.

Simply nock an arrow onto your bow’s string, flip up the u-shaped rest (with arrow capture bar) and the arrow is held in place, fully contained. It can’t fall off the arrow rest, even if the bow is turned upside down.

When the drawn bowstring is released, the arrow rest pivots forward and drops away from the path of the arrow.

Spring tension keeps the arrow rest from popping back up and hitting the arrow as it leaves the bow’s riser. The arrow rest is fully adjustable for both windage and elevation, and doesn’t fall away if the bow is let down from full draw.

New for 2016 is the Ultrarest MXT, which can be micro-tuned to a 2,000th of an inch.

“The arrow capture bar follows the body of the rest when it is adjusted left or right,” said Mike Carter. “This ensures that the capture bar is always centered up with the arrow holder.”

For more information visit their website at: www.qadinc.com.

* New this year from Muzzy, an industry leader in fixed-blade broadheads since 1984, is the Trocar Switch, the company’s first adjustable-cutting-diameter broadhead.

The 100-grain Trocar Switch features three razor-sharp 0.035-inch-thick blades that can be quickly and easily positioned in one of three settings for a 1-inch, 1 1/8-inch or 1 1/4-inch cutting diameter. The three configurations provide hunters with the option to customize the broadhead to the game being hunted or to achieve the best accuracy at varying target distances and arrow speeds.

For more outdoors news and information, see Art Lander’s Outdoors on KyForward.

The blades are set at a 2-degree right offset in the stainless steel Trocar ferrule, and each one is affixed by a steel shoulder screw with a steel blade-position collar keeping the blades locked into position. To change the cutting diameter of the Trocar Switch, simply loosen the broadhead on the arrow a few turns, slide down the blade collar, position each blade on the notch for the desired cut, and twist the broadhead tight to the arrow.

The Trocar Switch sells for about $40 for a three-pack. For more details visit www.muzzy.com.

If you have ever shot at a deer in low light and wondered where your arrow hit, try using a Lumenok, a lighted arrow nock. There’s no switch, no moving parts. The nock illuminates when the arrow is shot which makes arrow flight highly visible (Photo Provided)

If you have ever shot at a deer in low light and wondered where your arrow hit, try using a Lumenok, a lighted arrow nock. There’s no switch, no moving parts. The nock illuminates when the arrow is shot which makes arrow flight highly visible (Photo Provided)

* If you have ever shot at a deer in low light and wondered where your arrow hit, Eric Price has the solution — lighted arrow nocks.

“We started in 2002,” said Price, co-owner and co-inventor of Lumenok. “We’ve made a lot of improvements over the years.”

There’s no switch, no moving parts. The nock illuminates when the arrow is shot which makes arrow flight highly visible.

The Lumenok uses the arrow shaft to connect the battery and the light. Installed with a slight gap between the base of the nock and the end of the arrow shaft, when the string is released the force drives the nock slightly forward completing the circuit and lighting the light.

“Simplicity is the strength of the product,” said Price. “There’s a battery (replaceable), wire and LED light on an open circuit.”

A three-pack sells for about $32.

For more information, including an arrow chart for Lumenok sizing, visit: http://www.lumenok.com.

 

1Art Lander Jr.Art Lander Jr. is outdoors editor for KyForward. He is a native Kentuckian, a graduate of Western Kentucky University and a life-long hunter, angler, gardener and nature enthusiast. He has worked as a newspaper columnist, magazine journalist and author and is a former staff writer for Kentucky Afield Magazine, editor of the annual Kentucky Hunting & Trapping Guide and Kentucky Spring Hunting Guide, and co-writer of the Kentucky Afield Outdoors newspaper column.