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TheLevisaLazer.com - Big Sandy Sportsman

May 1, 2014


Eagle Ridge Golf News!

 

MissyMissyMay is here!!   Looking forward to a very eventful month here on the ridge!  Lots of info to send out this month on clinics and golf deals!!
 

CONGRATULATIONS! Our very own volunteer Ron Maynard for his Hole in One on April 21st, on hole #8, 120 yards using his pitching wedge.  Witnesses were a crowd of fellow volunteers who all play together weekly and have a great time:  Rayburn May, Lewis Marcum, Rick Blakenship, Doug Newsome, Milton Terry, Glen Boyd, and Leonard Wellman.   
 

 

Spring Golf Outings!

  • Saturday, May 3 Trinity Christian Academy, 9:00 a.m. shotgun
  • Friday, May 9 USP Big Sandy, 9:00 a.m. shotgun 
  • Saturday, May 10 New Life Outreach, 9:00 a.m. shotgun
  • Saturday, May 17 Rotary Club, 9:00 a.m. shotgunSaturday, May 24 Hurricane Missionary Church, 9:00 a.m. shotgun
  • Friday, June 6 Harper's Hope Foundation, 9:00 a.m shotgun

 

 

Clinics for Ladies and Juniors begin in May!!!   All clinics will run throughout the summer.  

Here are May dates:
 

 

2014 Junior Golf Program 

NEW!!!  SPRING

Sundays

May 4, 11, 18, 25

June 1, 8

Pee Wee Age 4 to 6

1:15 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Juniors 7 and up

2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Cost:  $10.00 per Junior per day

Ladies Clinics

$15.00 per player per day

6:00 p.m. to 7:30 pm.

Tuesday Nights 

May  6, 13, 20, 27

 

MEN'S GOLF LEAGUE!!  If you are interested in playing in the Lawrence County Men's Golf League applications are available BUT please also contact the pro shop or send an email to missy.kennedy@ky.gov or email Bill Jackson, billyjack.law@gmail.com. The league would like to create a database of all men's league emails so they may communicate with everyone via email.  
 

 

GOLF DEALS AND STEALS!!!

NEW!  Hometown Appreciation Day!! Every Wednesay, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. $25.00 per player, includes golf and cart.  If you live or work in either Lawrence County or Wayne County we want to say THANK YOU! for your support of Eagle Ridge Golf Course at Yatesville Lake State Park.  Come out on a Wednesday and enjoy a discounted round of golf.  **You must show proof of living in or working in Lawrence County or Wayne County!!! 

SENIOR DAY!  Every Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. $25.00 per player, includes golf and cart.  Age 62 +

2014 Golf Passes are available and may be purchased now!  We offer single, senior, couples, and family passes.  For a full listing of pass options and pricing please visit our website at www.parks.ky.gov.

The $25.00 Golf Card is now available.  Purchase a discount card for $25.00 and receive reduced rates on four rounds of golf/cart and your fifth round is FREE.  This is over a $50.00 savings!!  NEW this year is that there isn't an expiration date of these cards as in the past years!!  This card is only valid at Eagle Ridge Golf Course.

GOLFNOW!  All state park golf courses are now live with GolfNow.  Log on and book your tee time online for a discounted rate.  

MAY Pro Shop Hours:

Sunday to Saturday, 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Last tee time is 6:30 p.m.

Golf Carts must be returned to the parking lot by 8:45 p.m.




FYI!!!  The golf course is slated to go under construction around June 16th, switching over from Bent to Bermuda grass.  I will keep you updated on the status of the project as it is given to me.


See you at the course!


Missy Kennedy, PGA Head Golf Professional
Missy.Kennedy@ky.gov
Eagle Ridge Golf Course
Yatesville Lake State Park
(606) 673-4300 phone
(606) 673-4301 fax

Date: 04-23-2014

McCreary hunter becomes the hunted

25 pound bobcat attacks man while turkey hunting...

 

By Greg Bird
McCreary County Voice

Typically every hunter has a story about “the one that got away.” 

But for local sportsman Johnny Barnett, the one that got away was actually himself.

Kentucky BobcatKentucky BobcatCalling it an amazing and unbelievable experience, Barnett was attacked by a bobcat during a hunt, and quick action by his hunting partner and son may have saved him from serious injury at the very least.

Barnett and his 16-year old son Aaron were turkey hunting early Sunday morning in the woods of northern McCreary County, near Goodin Ridge, on their first hunting trip of the young turkey season.

Around 7:30 a.m. Barnett had spotted a hen a short distance away and began calling the bird with a striker, hoping to draw it closer so his son could get a clear shot at the bird.

Turkeys are notoriously keen to notice movement, so both hunters, bedecked in full camouflage, were as still as possible. As Barnett worked the call as stealthily as possible, a bobcat must have thought he had cornered breakfast and jumped at the hunter.

“I heard something in the leaves and looked to my left,” Barnett said. “The cat was already in the air. I just had enough time to duck my head and it landed on my back.”

Barnett’s son witnessed the attack and acted bravely, firing his shotgun off to the side to scare the big cat away. 

Barnett praised his son for his quick thinking and heroic act.

“If it wasn’t for his gunshot, it could have been worse,” he said. Barnett was wearing a padded turkey vest at the time, and that extra layer prevented the cat from inflicting any injury from his initial pounce. 

Estimating the bobcat as weighing between 20 and 25 pounds, Barnett said he distinctly felt the back paws push off his back as the cat leapt away.

The gunshot managed to scare the cat away, but a single pellet did ricochet off a nearby tree and ended up striking Barnett in the wrist. 

The wound was minor, and both hunters exited the woods and went to Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital where Barnett’s wrist was x-rayed. The pellet had not hit bone, nor caused any serious damage, so doctors opted to leave it in. 

Barnett said he would cherish the small wound as a reminder of Aaron’s quick thinking in an emergency.

Barnett said the event would not dissuade him from hunting again in the future. 

“You have to be so still when hunting turkeys, but it will be hard for me not to keep looking around me the next time we’re in the woods,” he laughed. “When you’re hunting, you never know if you’re the one being hunted.”

Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Biologist Mike Strunk said Barnett’s encounter was rare, but not an unbelievable occurrence. 

“You don’t think about it, but a lot of times as hunters, we are making calls, and the bobcats are out hunting for prey,” he said. “It makes sense, a turkey hen would be a natural food source for a bobcat.”

April 30 deadline to apply for elk hunt;

 

Kentucky Press News Service
 

FRANKFORT – Where there were no elk two decades ago in Kentucky, an estimated 10,000 or more now roam freely.

A landmark restoration effort re-established an elk herd in the state’s scenic southeastern region and created one of the most sought-after hunting opportunities east of the Rocky Mountains.

“Our elk herd is doing fantastic,” Tina Brunjes, deer and elk program coordinator with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, said in a state news release. “The harsh winter wasn’t enough to bother it.”

Hunters looking for a chance to check a Kentucky elk hunting adventure off their bucket list have until midnight (Eastern time) April 30 to enter this year’s quota hunt drawing. Completing the online application at fw.ky.gov well ahead of time is encouraged to avoid the expected last-minute rush.

Kentucky residents and those living out-of-state are eligible to apply for as many as two of the four permit types but can only be drawn for one. Each application costs $10.
Kentucky Fish and Wildlife will issue 1,000 general quota hunt permits and 10 youth permits this year through a random computer drawing conducted in early May by the Kentucky Commonwealth Office of Technology. Results will be posted online at fw.ky.gov.

Kentucky’s elk herd is the largest east of the Rocky Mountains and more than all the states east of the Mississippi River combined. The elk restoration zone in southeast Kentucky covers 16 counties and more than 4 million acres.

“The abundance and accessibility of Kentucky’s elk continue to produce high hunter success rates,” Brunjes said.

Eighty-eight percent of bull elk hunters using a gun last year enjoyed a successful hunt, while 69 percent of the hunters utilizing archery equipment successfully harvested a bull. The success rate for cow archery hunters was 46 percent last year but almost 78 percent among hunters using a firearm for cow elk.

“I think hunters will find this year to be very similar to last year,” Brunjes said. “You are going to have to work for it. You may not be able to go out opening morning, harvest your elk and be on the road by noon.

“The elk are there but some of the old cows that are leading these herds have been through 13 seasons now. I would encourage anyone who is truly a passionate bow hunter looking for a test to put in for that cow elk archery tag because you will earn that cow elk.”

The season limit of 250 bulls and 750 cow elk is unchanged from last year, as is the allotment among tag types.

Kentucky Fish and Wildlife will issue 150 firearms permits and 100 archery/crossbow permits for bulls; 460 firearms permits and 290 archery/crossbow permits for cow elk.
Demand is greatest for the bull firearms permit and lowest for the cow archery hunts.
Kentucky residents applying for a cow archery tag had a 1 in 13 chance of being drawn last year compared to 1 in 134 for bull firearms.

The bull elk firearms seasons are spread over two separate, weeklong hunts in October while the cow elk firearms seasons are split into two weeklong hunts in December.

A special bull archery season opens before the firearms season.Hunters ages 15 and younger can apply for the youth-only quota hunt during the same application period as the general elk quota hunt drawing. They may also apply for the general quota elk hunt drawing, but cannot be drawn for both in the same year.

“The youth-only option does not appear until the child’s birthday is entered in the drawing application process,” Brunjes said. “The youth permit is good during all seasons and it’s an either-sex permit. There’s more opportunity to hunt with that permit.”

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