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December 17, 2017

Vol. Fire depts., Ky Forestry help contain 50 acre blaze which threatened homes in the area

 Lawrence Co. Emergency Services director Mike Woods announced on social media late yesterday that a large brush fire in the Roe Creek area threatened several homes and properties.

Another large fire was squelched by the Lowmansville Vol. FD, Woods said.

Woods cautioned about burning anything outside "until we get some rain or other precipitation" because of the the extremely dry conditions. 

Volunteer fire departments from Big Sandy, Louisa and Fallsburg combined with Ky. Forestry to put out a large brush fire that threatened several structures.Volunteer fire departments from Big Sandy, Louisa and Fallsburg combined with Ky. Forestry to put out a large brush fire that threatened several structures.

…press release from Lawrence Co. EMS

"...Around 2:15 pm December 16th Lawrence County E-911 received a report of an out of control brush fire at the head of Roe Cr. Road.

Upon arrival of the Big Sandy Volunteer Fire Department they found a rapidly growing brush fire and were concerned about multiple structures in the area.

Members of Big Sandy began attacking the fire and protecting nearby structures and requested Fallsburg Volunteer Fire Department and the Ky. Division of Forestry to respond to assist with fighting the fire and protecting additional structures.

The fire burned between 25 and 50 acres before being doused by local emergency workers.The fire burned between 25 and 50 acres before being doused by local emergency workers.

Members of Fallsburg VFD staged just east of the fire to protect structures on that end of the roadway while members of Big Sandy and the Division of Forestry continued to fight the fire and protect structures on the west end of Roe Creek.

The departments were initially concerned about the fire continuing to grow on the west end towards KY 707 but after a shift in wind and positive results in fighting the fire the main concern was shifted to structures on the east end and power lines in the area.

Firefighters were able to keep the fire from reaching any structures and kept the fire contained to the wooded area.

The Ky. Division of Forestry brought two bulldozers to help fight the brush fire.The Ky. Division of Forestry brought two bulldozers to help fight the brush fire.

 

The Kentucky Division of Forestry responded multiple crews and two bulldozers to help stop the fire. The fire departments were able to clear the scene around 6:30 PM while the KDOF remained on scene completing fire lines around the entire fire.

It is estimated the fire burned between 25 and 50 acres. We would like to thank the American Red Cross serving Eastern Kentucky for their assistance today.

Even though the fall fire season ended on Friday December 15, we recommend everyone refrain from burning until we receive some significant rain or snow. In addition to this fire we also had another brush fire handled by Lowmansville Fire Department earlier in the day."

 

December 15, 2017

Wayne Co. Sheriff Rick Thompson and C.U.F.F.E.DWayne Co. Sheriff Rick Thompson and C.U.F.F.E.D

Press release

Today, the US MARSHALS CUFFED TASK FORCE arrested Christopher Clark, of Huntington, and Okie Corn, of Louisa, for drug warrants issued by the WCSD Drug Enforcement Unit.

Christopher Clark, left,  of Huntington and Okie Corn of Louisa Christopher Clark, left, of Huntington and Okie Corn of Louisa Clark is charged with Possession with Intent to Deliver Heroin after he made arrangements with a buyer to meet him at Spring Valley High School to sell him Heroin this past weekend. The WCSD Drug Enforcement Unit and road patrol deputies intercepted Christopher and seized appx 3 grams of Heroin.

Okie Corn was stopped by the WCSD Drug Enforcement Unit after leaving a known drug house in the Fort Gay area. During the stop, when the DEU made contact with Okie he still had Oxycodone in his hand and cash. A search yielded multiple baggies of marijuana packaged for distribution.

Okie is charged with Possession with Intent to Deliver x 2. Sheriff Thompson says the DEU has received tips that Okie Corn was selling drugs in the Fort Gay area. 

 

Date: 12-14-2017

Kentucky leads nation in HIV vulnerable counties, Lawrence County is 39th on list of 220 counties at risk in nation...

Lawrence Health Dept. director adds comment to story

Mark,

"...As you know, Lawrence County is listed as #39 on that list of 220 US counties vulnerable to an HIV outbreak and we do not have a needle exchange program. Unlike Wolfe County, we actually have the funds ready to go. Lawrence County ASAP recently received a $20,000 Harm Reduction grant from KY – ASAP. We have received Board of Health approval, Louisa City Council approval and have the necessary funding.

We simply need approval from Lawrence County Fiscal Court and we can implement a Harm Reduction Syringe Exchange Program for Lawrence County."


"...I am aware that this program will not solve the drug crisis, but it will lessen the harm that comes with IV drug use by reducing the spread of Hepatitis C and HIV, providing education on proper disposal of needles and linking clients to substance use treatment. I encourage people to share their opinions of the program with their magistrates, whether in favor of the program or not. Through collaboration with law enforcement, healthcare providers, and counseling and treatment services we can make our community a healthier place for everyone."


Thank you,
Debbie

###

Kentucky's Appalachian hills may be site of the next big HIV outbreak

ZOE, Ky. – Andiria Tipton figured it was her job, as the older kid, to crawl around under a bed and pick up dirty drug needles.

She’s matter-of-fact about why: “I had to keep them from my little sister.”

Lisa Lacy Helterbrand, right, signs off on paperwork for Laura Hafley after she completed volunteer hours for Appalachian Ministries in helping to wrap Christmas presents for children in need. "You don't change people's lives just by giving them things," Lisa said. "We're hoping that education opportunities and jobs can do a lot for this area." Nov. 30, 2017  Alton Strupp/Louisville Courier JournalLisa Lacy Helterbrand, right, signs off on paperwork for Laura Hafley after she completed volunteer hours for Appalachian Ministries in helping to wrap Christmas presents for children in need. "You don't change people's lives just by giving them things," Lisa said. "We're hoping that education opportunities and jobs can do a lot for this area." Nov. 30, 2017 Alton Strupp/Louisville Courier Journal

Andiria has learned a lot about the hellish world of addiction in her short 10 years. But she’s also found refuge from it as one of eight kids being raised by Lisa Lacy-Helterbrand, who takes in children of people struggling with addiction. All but one began life in drug withdrawal.

Addiction is endemic in these Appalachian hills. It’s gained so much ground that the nation’s foremost health experts fear one plague will spawn another, that rampant intravenous opioid use will lead to a drug-fueled HIV outbreak like the one that struck Austin, Indiana in 2015. That outbreak was the largest to hit rural America in recent history, with a rate comparable to countries in Africa.

Lee County, where Lacy-Helterbrand’s family lives, is one of 54 in Kentucky and 220 nationwide identified by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as the most vulnerable to a similar outbreak. Neighboring Wolfe County tops the list as the most likely place to become the next Austin.

Kentucky leads the nation in vulnerable counties, with most clustered in an Appalachian region marred by drugs, doctor shortages, economic ruin and hopelessness. One drug needle shared by someone with HIV could easily be the match to this powder keg.

Yet only 33 of the 220 vulnerable counties have working exchanges where addicts can trade dirty needles for clean ones, Courier Journal found. Of Kentucky's 54 vulnerable counties, 33 lack needle exchanges. Among them is Wolfe, which approved an exchange but is still trying to come up with money for the needles.

appalachia ministries 2appalachia ministries 2

Experts say forsaking these places could lead to the resurgence of a disease many Americans consider an old threat. Drug-related HIV infections are already creeping up across the nation. Even now, an outbreak may be quietly brewing.

“People have forgotten about HIV. … But it’s becoming clear you have the stage set for a major increase in these infections (in places) we’ve basically ignored,” said Dr. Paul Volberding, director of the University of California, San Francisco AIDS Research Institute. “Whenever we have an infectious disease and we turn our back, it bites us.”

Many believe the solution begins with fighting addiction in each family, school and community. But the sheer scope of the drug scourge dwarfs grassroots efforts – even by dedicated residents like Lacy-Helterbrand, who not only takes in children but also directs an organization that helps other needy Appalachian kids.

By Laura Ungar
Louisville Courier-Journal

REST OF STORY CLICK HERE