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MONDAY, MAY 22, 2017

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President Trump's detailed budget, to be released Tuesday, "would follow through on a bill passed by House Republicans" to cut Medicaid by more than $800 billion over 10 years," Damian Paletta reports for The Washington Post. "The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that this could cut off Medicaid benefits for about 10 million people over the next decade."

The CBO said in March that the initial version of the Republican health bill could cost 24 million people insurance. The impact would be greater in rural areas. To see a Democratic-compiled rundown of how CBO thinks the bill would affect each of the 435 congressional districts, click here. A CBO scoring of the slightly revised bill is due Wednesday.

"The White House also will call for giving states more flexibility to impose work requirements for people in different kinds of anti-poverty programs, people familiar with the budget plan said, potentially leading to a flood of changes in states led by conservative governors," Paletta writes. "Numerous social-welfare programs grew after the financial crisis, leading to complaints from many Republicans that more should be done to shift people out of these programs and back into the workforce. Shortly after he was sworn in, Trump said, 'We want to get our people off welfare and back to work. . . . It’s out of control.'”

"Trump’s decision to include the Medicaid cuts is significant because it shows he is rejecting calls from a number of Senate Republicans not to reverse the expansion of Medicaid that President Barack Obama achieved as part of the Affordable Care Act," Paletta writes. "The House has voted to cut the Medicaid funding, but Senate Republicans have signaled they are likely to start from scratch."

"The White House also is expected to propose changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, though precise details couldn’t be learned," Paletta reports. "An average of 44 million people received SNAP benefits in 2016, down from a peak of 47 million in 2013. Just 28 million people received the benefits in 2008." Many impoverished rural residents rely on SNAP, formerly known as food stamps.

Written by Tim Mandell Posted at 5/22/2017 12:07:00 PM

 

 

Ashland, Ky. (May 22, 2017) – The Kentucky State Police Post 14 Ashland is investigating a fatal vehicle collision involving multiple vehicles. The collision occurred around 0818 PM Friday evening on KY 7 in the area of the KY 773 intersection just south of Grayson, KY.

Just prior to the collision occurring Carter County Deputy Greg Gillium conducted a traffic stop on Carol Malone Boulevard with a white 2016 Chevy Malibu after receiving complaintsJust prior to the collision occurring Carter County Deputy Greg Gillium conducted a traffic stop on Carol Malone Boulevard with a white 2016 Chevy Malibu after receiving complaints

Just prior to the collision occurring Carter County Deputy Greg Gillium conducted a traffic stop on Carol Malone Boulevard with a white 2016 Chevy Malibu after receiving complaints of the vehicle being operated in a reckless manner. While conducting the traffic stop Jamie D. Howard, age 36, of Olive Hill, KY fled from the scene in the Malibu and traveled South on KY 7. As Howard passed the KY 7 and KY 773 intersection he attempted to pass a 2016 Chevy Silverado, Operated by Patricia Knipp. Howard’s vehicle struck the rear driver side of the Silverado causing him to lose control, travel into the northbound lane and into the path of a 1996 Chevy Silverado. The Chevy Silverado, operated by Danny Haywood, was traveling North on KY 7, was unable to avoid the collision and impacted Howard in the driver side causing the vehicle to separate in two pieces. All vehicles came to a final rest on the bridge just south of the KY7 and KY773 intersection.

2016 White Chevy Malibu

Jamie D. Howard, age 36, of Olive Hill, KY sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene. He was wearing his seatbelt at the time of the collision. Alcohol usage and speed appear to be contributing factors to the collision.

2016 Grey Chevy Silverado

Patricia G. Knipp (Operator), age 64, of Grayson, KY was properly belted, not injured and refused medical treatment.

Laura Rayburn, (Passenger) was properly belted, not injured and refused medical treatment

1996 Blue Chevy Silverado

Danny Haywood (Operator), age 17, of Grayson, KY was properly belted at the time of the collision. Haywood sustained serious, but non-life threatening injuries (broken femur, cuts, scrapes and bruises) and was transported to Cabell Huntington Hospital for treatment.

Tony A. Haywood (Passenger in Front), age 42, of Grayson, KY was not wearing a seatbelt at the time of the collision. Haywood sustained non-life threatening injuries (cuts, scrapes and bruises) and was transported to Cabell Huntington Hospital for treatment.

Six year of age juvenile (Rear Passenger on Driver Side) was properly belted with booster seat. She sustained non-life threatening injuries (cuts, scrapes and bruises) and was transported to Cabell Huntington Hospital for treatment.

Multiple agencies responded including: Grayson Fire Department, Olive Hill Fire Department, Carter County EMS, Carter County Sheriff’s Department, Olive Hill Police Department and the Carter County Coroner’s Office.

The Collision remains under investigation by Trooper Bobby King.

 

13 year-old Maltese make it home

The owners of Trixie the dog react to a note from a California vet saying their dog -- missing for 2 years -- had been found in his state. They were reunited with their dog recently.The owners of Trixie the dog react to a note from a California vet saying their dog -- missing for 2 years -- had been found in his state. They were reunited with their dog recently.

Tammy Crews waited anxiously in the Nashville airport to be reunited with her dog named Trixie Love Crews.

Trixie had been missing for two and a half years, and it wasn’t until Crews got a call from an animal shelter in California – more than 2,000 miles away – that she had any hope of seeing her again.

As she sat by the baggage claim, Crews thought she heard whimpering but couldn’t be sure it wasn’t just a squeaky wheel. Then she saw the dog carrier and broke into tears.

As the Maltese pawed at the bars of her cage, an airport employee cut away the last bit of wiring holding the door shut. The two reunited with a hug and affectionate kisses.

“She’s so little,” Crews said in between tears. “She’s lost a lot of weight.” 

Now, Trixie is settling back into her old home with Crews, her husband, Thad, and their son. The family’s three other dogs are welcoming her back too as another dog named Stella constantly watches over her.

“The second they smelled her they knew who she was,” Crews said of her pets.

When Trixie got out of their home off Cemetery Road and disappeared in January 2015, Crews scrambled to find her.

Her dog, now roughly 13 years old, had just had surgery and wouldn’t have the anti-inflammatory medicine she needed. Crews posted flyers advertising a reward along the road and at gas stations. She knocked on neighbors’ doors and got them involved.

There were many false alarms even long after she went missing, Crews said.

Her former neighbor Blythe Ann Hockensmith helped her search by checking along Cemetery Road and calling for her around a nearby sinkhole.

“She was just in a panic,” Hockensmith said of Crews. “It seemed like (Trixie) actually just dropped off the face of the Earth.”

Looking back, Crews remembers a group of workers nearby that day and believes she might have been stolen. She can easily see Trixie, a friendly dog, bounding out of the house through her doggie door and going over to greet them.

Despite how long they were separated, Crews always held out hope that they would be reunited. Trixie had a microchip that could be used to trace her back to her owner if anyone brought her into a veterinarian’s office or animal shelter.

That day came last week when Trixie was found wandering in a Wal-Mart parking lot in Turlock, Calif., which is more than 2,200 miles from Bowling Green. Trixie, malnourished and her hair matted, was taken to Turlock Animal Services.

There, employee Glena Jackson started running through phone numbers registered to Trixie’s microchip. The first phone number was the family’s old home phone and failed to get through, but Jackson got lucky with a second phone number of the family’s vet.

Crews’ husband Thad remembers when the call came and his wife’s reaction.

“I was worried that someone had died,” he said.

Ultimately, Jackson drove more than two hours to Sacramento to put Trixie on a plane for Nashville, where the family picked her up late Saturday night. 

 Click pic for video

When Crews embraced Trixie, the word that went through her mind was “finally.”

Now, Crews spends a lot of her time researching how to restore her dog’s health. The entire family will be reunited next month when her other two college-age children return from studying overseas.

Hockensmith calls the story “unbelievable.”

“You usually don’t have happy endings,” she said.

Hockensmith remembers when one of her own dogs was killed by a passing car as she went out to get her mail. She also remembers how Crews and her daughter consoled her. Her appreciation of a dog’s love is deep, she said.

“It’s a love that you can’t even fathom,” she said.

Thad Crews stressed the importance of getting pets microchipped. The Bowling Green-Warren County Humane Society offers the service for a $20 fee, no appointment needed.

“We wouldn’t have got her back without the microchip,” Thad Crew said.

As an animal lover, Crews loves watching videos of dogs being reunited with their owners returning from military service or other long absences.

“I can’t believe that this is our story,” she said sitting on her living room sofa with her family and pets around her.

By Aaron Mudd
Bowling Green Daily News