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Date: 08-14-2017

Kentucky man named Food Network's next big 'Star' - gets own cooking show

Kentuckian Jason Smith, a school cafeteria manager from Carter County, beat out two other competitors Sunday night on cable TV's Food Network to win his own cooking showKentuckian Jason Smith, a school cafeteria manager from Carter County, beat out two other competitors Sunday night on cable TV's Food Network to win his own cooking show

Kentucky Press News Service

Kentuckian Jason Smith, a school cafeteria manager from Carter County, beat out two other competitors Sunday night on cable TV's Food Network to win his own cooking show. Smith earned the title of Food Network's next Star, according to the network's magazine.

Smith beat out a number of challengers during the 11-week process of determining the winner.

"Gosh. For once in my life, I’m speechless. I’m very honored. I’m very humbled by being named the next Food Network Star. I’m very excited. It’s just one of those things that’s hard for me to even put into words. I feel like I have made an accomplishment beyond accomplishments that I’ve ever set for myself. Or it still hasn’t sunk in. I don’t know what to say," Smith told Food Network Star.

The Courier-Journal reported last week: "If the Kentucky cook from Carter County wins, he won't be the first from the Commonwealth to be awarded a Food Network gig.

"Louisville chef Damaris Phillips started her celebrity chef career after winning Season 9 of "Food Network Stars." Phillips became the host of the Food Network show "Southern at Heart" and has stayed busy ever since."

During Sunday night's show announcing the winner, Smith credited his mother, a Laurel County resident, for his success.

 

AUGUST 10, 2017

Play about the Hatfield-McCoy feud, where it happened, resonates in today's America, actor says

L to R: Roger, Justin and Sam Belcher are three generations in "Blood Song." (Appalachian News-Express photo: Elaine Belcher)L to R: Roger, Justin and Sam Belcher are three generations in "Blood Song." (Appalachian News-Express photo: Elaine Belcher)


The feud between the Hatfield and McCoy families is iconic in American lore, but a descendant of the Hatfield side says the families' fight has eerie parallels in today's often volatile atmosphere. Modern liberals and conservatives form tribes and behave "in ways the original Hatfields and McCoys would have easily recognized," Justin Belcher writes for The Huffington Post. He says that the sensationalism surrounding the feud also spurred the birth of yellow journalism, perhaps a precursor of today's "fake news." And the avid news coverage of the feud also served to widen the gap between urban and rural Americans. It encouraged the urban populace to "look down on mountain folk" while rural dwellers were convinced that their urban counterparts had "abandoned American traditions and values." Both then and now, he says, feelings trump facts, and those who urge calm and peace are often ignored.

Belcher and other descendants of the feuding families are bringing the past into the spotlight with a new production of a play called "Blood Song: The Story of the Hatfield and McCoys" (click here for tickets and showtimes). The play will run on Fridays and Saturdays in August at the (where else?) Hatfield & McCoy Park Outdoor Theatre in McCarr, Ky., right in the middle of where the original feud took place.

Belcher hopes the audience can learn from the past and apply the lessons to today. "Whether they’re part of feuding families, the rural urban divide, or polarized politics, Americans are still neighbors, and neighbors need each other. They also need to learn how to settle their differences amicably and peacefully. America has often undertaken to teach Appalachia how to do things better; today lessons from Appalachia’s past can teach America the same thing."

Written by Heather Chapman

Date: 08-10-2017

GLEN CAMPBELL WAS MORE THAN AN ENTERTAINER TO ONE KENTUCKIAN, HE WAS A FRIEND

Glen Campbell, left, and his wife, Kimberly, with Hazard businessman L.D. Gorman in 2012 at the Lexington Opera House. Campbell played there that year. Courtesy of L.D. GormanGlen Campbell, left, and his wife, Kimberly, with Hazard businessman L.D. Gorman in 2012 at the Lexington Opera House. Campbell played there that year. Courtesy of L.D. Gorman

Singer Glen Campbell, who died Tuesday, was an occasional visitor to Eastern Kentucky, thanks to his friendship with coal operator and businessman L.D. Gorman.

Gorman booked Campbell in July 1973 to perform two free concerts in Hazard to mark the 50th anniversary of People’s Bank & Trust. Gorman was the bank’s president at the time.

“We thought it would be great to have something big for that occasion,” Gorman said Wednesday.

“He and I became great friends. He visited me many times here in Hazard, and I played in his golf tournament” in Los Angeles.

Lexington resident Frank Barker remembered taking Campbell on a tour of Hazard and Perry County in 1968. Campbell came to Hazard for the dedication of Daniel Field, the football field named for Gorman’s uncle, Dewey Daniel.

A year earlier, Campbell had released two of his big hits: “Gentle on My Mind” and “By the Time I Get to Phoenix.” Barker worked for First Security Bank in Lexington, and he met Gorman through his work.

“L.D. asked me to take him on a tour of the area, and I did,” Barker said. Campbell “would get out talk to people, shake hands with them, rub the kids’ heads. I showed him a couple of coal operations that L.D. had.”

Barker said Campbell “made his mind up that whatever he made from L.D. that he was going to donate it back to those poverty-stricken kids. It just touched his heart.”

“Glen was a very kind person,” Gorman said.

An October 1974 story in the Herald-Leader said Gorman brought Campbell to a University of Kentucky football practice. Campbell spoke with Coach Fran Curci and shook hands with the players.

When Campbell met defensive tackle Pat Donley, Campbell asked how much he weighed.

“About 265,” Donley said.

“You could go bear hunting with a switch,” Campbell quipped.

Gorman said the Hazard FM radio station, WSGS 101.1, played Campbell’s songs Wednesday morning in tribute to his friend.

Gorman has an Ovation guitar that Campbell gave him as a birthday present. The guitar is signed “To my friend LD., Glen Campbell.”

By Greg Kocher
Lexington Herald-Leader