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August 21, 2017;

6:00 p.m.

Lawrence County High School

Louisa, Kentucky

 

AGENDA

1. CALL TO ORDER

Mission:  Every Child College and Career Ready; A Community Involved and Informed

The Pledge to the United States Flag

2. APPROVE AGENDA

3. STUDENT/STAFF PRESENTATIONS/RECOGNITIONS

3.A. Governor’s Scholar Program: Carrie Jo Cecil

4. COMMUNICATION

4.A. Superintendent’s Update

4.A.1. Solar Eclipse Day's impact to school calendar

4.A.2. Thank you to Pathways for sponsoring Opening Day breakfast

4.A.3. Local Planning Committee update

4.A.4. LCHS One-to-One update

4.A.5. Steele Reese Foundation grants for Blaine and LCHS

4.A.6. Instructional data collection process synopsis

4.A.7.  Enrollment numbers:  Spring 2017 vs. Fall 2017   

4.A.8.  PETLL-ACT work

4.A.9.  Dual Credit brochure 

4.B. Public Comment

5. STUDENT LEARNING AND SUPPORT SERVICES

5.A. Approve Minutes of the July 17, 2017 Regular Meeting and July 25, 2017 Special Meeting

5.B. Approve Claims and Orders of the Treasurer

5.C. Approve the Monthly Financial Report: Finance Officer Brandi VanHoose

5.C.1. Bank Reconciliation Report

5.C.2. MUNIS Balance Sheet and Monthly Financial Report

5.C.3. Finance Update

CONSENT AGENDA

5.D. Approve Consent Agenda items:

5.D.1. Per diem and expenses for members present and for allowable expenses for Jim See at the KSBA Summer Leadership Conference

5.D.2. Contracts & Services:

5.D.2.a.  Contract between Andrea Cyrus and LEES to paint images in the Louisa East Elementary Gym: Total: $600

5.D.2.b. Lawrence County Board of Education with Superior Office Service, Inc.; Renewal of Maintenance Contract for copiers: IR2200 #MPG22142 ($574) and IR5000 #MPL23317 ($750); 8-7-17 to 8-7-18

5.D.2.c. Agreement between Louisa East Elementary and UK Opera Theatre for performance on September 19, 201; no cost

5.D.2.d. Shoutpoint Infinite Campus Messenger annual service agreement: $3,105

5.D.2.e. Lawrence County Schools 2018-2019 Nonresident Contracts with Ashland Independent, Boyd County, Carter County, Elliott County, Johnson County, Martin County, Morgan County, Paintsville Independent, and Russell Independent Boards of Education

5.D.3. Requests:

5.D.3.a. Fundraisers:  

5.D.3.a.1. Lawrence County High School

5.D.3.a.2. Blaine Elementary

5.D.3.a.3. Louisa Middle School

5.D.3.a.4. Louisa East Elementary

5.D.3.b. Use of Facilities:

5.D.3.b.1. Louisa West Elementary parking area and cafeteria/restroom facility for 28th Annual Auto Show; September 9, 2017; Ted Kelley on behalf of Septemberfest Auto Show Committee; Septemberfest insurance

5.D.3.b.2. Louisa West Elementary for Zumba/Pound Fitness; October 2017 through June 30, 2018; Jennifer Pannell; insurance provided

5.D.3.b.3. Louisa East Elementary (and possibly Blaine and Fallsburg) by Child Evangelism Fellowship (CEF) of Kentucky & Louisa First Baptist Church for after school Good News Club; 2017-18 school year; one day a week; Kari Ash and Teresa Kunze; insurance provided

5.D.3.b.4. Blaine Elementary School by Blaine High School Alumni Committee for the annual reunion on September 9, 2017; Sue Smith

5.D.3.b.5. LCHS cafeteria by Catalpa Free Will Baptist Church for preparation of chicken and dumplings; September 29, 2017; Melissa Cox and Janice Salyer; insurance provided

5.D.3.c. Request for assistance:

5.D.3.c.1. High school: reconditioning of football helmets: $3,094.13

5.D.4. For Review/FYI: (no action required)

5.D.4.a. School Activity Fund Reports: July

5.D.4.b. SBDM/Advisory Council Minutes (FES, BES, LEES, LWES, LMS)

5.D.4.c. 2017-18 LC Schools Parent & Student Handbook

5.D.4.d. Monthly Energy Report

5.E. Approve a Resolution authorizing Superintendent Fletcher to provide funding support up to $1,406 to the Kentucky School Board Association’s intervention efforts in the proposed Kentucky Power Company’s request to increase electric rates

5.F. Update on Drug Awareness Curriculum

5.G. Approve Board of Education representative(s) on the District Improvement Plan Committee

5.H. Approve appointment of District Improvement Plan Committee Members

5.I. Approve annual acknowledgement of the Board’s review of the Data Security and Breach Notification Best Practice Guide and the implementation of best practices that meet the needs of personal information reasonable security in the District, as set forth in 702 KAR 1:170

5.J. Approve Certification for the 2017-18 School Year Constitutionally Protected Prayer in Public School and to acknowledge receipt and review of KRS 158.183 and KRS158.195 regarding Student Free Speech and Religious Liberty Rights

5.K. Approve payment of textbook costs for Craft Academy and Gatton Academy students

5.L. Superintendent/designee to delay/cancel school

5.M. Approve Petition for Early Enrollment

5.N. Approve to enter Executive Session for the purpose of discussion of legal issues (proposed and/or pending litigation) pursuant to KRS 61.810(1)(c)

5.O. Approve return to Open Session

5.P. New Business

6. PERSONNEL

6.A. Approve creation, abolishment, and/or changes regarding positions

6.B. Approve update to Lawrence County Schools 2017-2018 Salary Schedule

6.C. Approve to acknowledge receipt of Superintendent's Personnel Action/Update   

7. ADJOURNMENT

 

ASHLAND, Ky., Aug. 16, 2017 – Kentucky Power summer internships give recent high school graduates work experience and allows Kentucky Power to show newcomers what goes into effectively operating an electric utility.

Nick Kessinger of Louisa and Ethan Coleman of Phelps, 2017 graduates of Morehead State University’s Craft Academy for Excellence in Science and Mathematics, joined Kentucky Power in June as summer interns.

Kessinger was assigned to the Ashland service center and Coleman at the Pikeville service center.

Craft Academy graduates and summer interns Nick Kessinger, left, and Ethan Coleman, right, present their mobile alerts contest plan to Kentucky Power President Matt Satterwhite, Customer Services Director Del Borden and Managing Director Distribution Operations Everett Phillips. The two spent their summer breaks working for Kentucky Power in Pikeville and Ashland.Craft Academy graduates and summer interns Nick Kessinger, left, and Ethan Coleman, right, present their mobile alerts contest plan to Kentucky Power President Matt Satterwhite, Customer Services Director Del Borden and Managing Director Distribution Operations Everett Phillips. The two spent their summer breaks working for Kentucky Power in Pikeville and Ashland.

While Kentucky Power has had interns in the past, most were already college students who were well into their college studies. Coleman and Kessinger, however, are recent high school graduates and the first Craft Academy graduates to intern at Kentucky Power.

The Craft Academy is a dual-credit program for academically exceptional Kentucky students. The program allows high school juniors and seniors to finish school while also completing up to two years of university coursework. The Craft Academy provides tuition, housing and meal plans at no cost to select students and allows them to live on campus for the fall and spring semesters of their final two years of high school.

“We so appreciate the opportunity to involve Craft Academy students in internships,” said Craft Academy Director Carol Christian. “We hope to expand our internships and we hope to continue with Kentucky Power in this collaborative partnership.”

Kentucky Power President Matt Satterwhite said he wanted to show Kentucky Power’s support of education and encourage young people in eastern Kentucky like Kessinger and Coleman to build upon their experience at the Craft Academy and pursue careers in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and math.

“There is an urgent need across the country and here in eastern Kentucky to increase student achievement and interest in STEM fields because they play an increasingly critical role in ensuring our collective economic growth,” Satterwhite said. “As a community partner and president of a business that depends upon employees with a good understanding of math and science, I want Kentucky Power to encourage students in this area. Our internships can help do that.”

One of the interns’ final projects uses technology to reach customers. They are the writers, producers and directors of a Facebook video contest that offers customers who sign up for Kentucky Power’s mobile alerts the chance to win a free Yeti cooler or one of three Yeti tumblers. The video, which features a dog, will launch soon on Kentucky Power’s Facebook page.

“I found the video experience to be very educating,” Kessinger said. “Working with the mindset that this would be used as a marketing tool changed the planning process for the video production. We had to be mindful of what would be the best way to catch customer’s attention and we found using a popular trend called Yeti Pup would be the best way.”

Since beginning with Kentucky Power, Kessinger has worked not only on the marketing contest, but also closely with meter revenue operators performing circuit inspections, engineering technicians for pole inspections and district engineers retrieving load loggers.

A recent graduate of Lawrence County High School and Craft Academy, Kessinger is pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, but he also is interested in electrical engineering. While attending Craft, Kessinger was able to complete 70 hours of university coursework that can be applied to his degree.

“I think the Craft Academy was very beneficial,” Kessinger said. “The environment where you’re interacting with college students and being in college classrooms, it’s a big maturing stage.”

Coleman, a recent graduate of Phelps High School and Craft Academy, studied Government/International Studies at Craft, where he was able to complete 56 hours of college-level coursework.

“I took mostly general education courses,” Coleman said. “But I also received a healthy dose of physics, mathematics and engineering courses that were requirements to graduate from the Craft Academy.”

Coleman has been busy applying this knowledge since starting his internship with Kentucky Power. He has worked closely with economic development, regulatory, district engineers and the meter revenue operators. He recounts the first economic development meeting he attended in Hazard with Jacob Colley, Kentucky Power external affairs manager, and Dave Tatman, director of the Kentucky Automotive Industry Association.

“I was grateful to meet those involved in the economic development of the region,” Coleman said. “It has allowed me to see the inner workings of a power company and made me aware that it’s more complex than I previously thought.”

Kessinger said his first trip to the field was with Dale Chatterton, Ashland District manager, to retrieve load loggers that had previously been installed on lines and then analyzed the data.

“As I laced up my steel-toed boots and put on my gloves, reflective vest, safety glasses and hard hat, I started to get nervous,” Kessinger said. “Working with live lines for the first time will do that.

“I really value my experience with Kentucky Power,” Kessinger said. “I’ve been around several people that are close to the retirement age, and to know that Kentucky Power treats their employees well enough that a lot of them work here their entire careers shows me that this is a great company.”

Kessinger and Coleman are both enrolled at Morehead State University this fall as full-time juniors after earning enough college credits at Craft Academy.

“The Craft Academy produces well educated and highly capable students,” Satterwhite said. “I welcome the opportunity to work with other interns like Nick and Ethan at Kentucky Power in the future.”

 

AUGUST 15, 2017

Lawrence County High School student Lincoln Rose graduates from The Center for Rural Development’s 2017 Class of Rogers Scholars

2017 Rogers Scholars Lincoln Rose of Lawrence County.2017 Rogers Scholars Lincoln Rose of Lawrence County.Lawrence County High School student Lincoln Rose graduated this summer from The Center for Rural Development’s 2017 Rogers Scholars program.

Rogers Scholars is an intensive one-week summer leadership program that provides valuable leadership skills and exclusive college scholarship opportunities for high school students in Southern and Eastern Kentucky to seize their full potential as the region’s next generation of business and entrepreneurial leaders.

“I will treasure the time I spent at Rogers Scholars for the rest of my life,” Rose said. “I learned what it is like to be part of a community and take steps to improve it.”

Sixty-two high school students from 45 Kentucky counties graduated this summer from the 2017 Class of Rogers Scholars. The program was held on the campus of Lindsey Wilson College in South Central Kentucky in Adair County.

“We have had another incredible summer for the Rogers Scholars program,” said Laura Glover, Managing Director of Operations at The Center. “We’ve had students from all over Southern and Eastern Kentucky gather together to learn and grow with the program. This is an extremely intelligent and dedicated group of young individuals. We look forward to seeing what is in store for them in the future.”

Rose, 16, is the son of Chris and Carmella Rose of Blaine.

Since the program began, 1,182 high school students have graduated from Rogers Scholars, and potential scholarships valued at more than $7.2 million have been offered to graduates from 17 participating colleges and universities.

For more information about the Rogers Scholars program, call 606-677-6000 or visit www.centeryouthprograms.com.

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Sheldon Clark High School student Allison Horn graduates from The Center for Rural Development’s 2017 Class of Rogers Scholars

2017 Rogers Scholar Allison Horn of Martin County.2017 Rogers Scholar Allison Horn of Martin County.Sheldon Clark High School student Allison Horn graduated this summer from The Center for Rural Development’s 2017 Rogers Scholars program.


Rogers Scholars is an intensive one-week summer leadership program that provides valuable leadership skills and exclusive college scholarship opportunities for high school students in Southern and Eastern Kentucky to seize their full potential as the region’s next generation of business and entrepreneurial leaders.

“This program meant a lot to me, because it taught me how to be a leader in my community,” Horn said. “I hope to bring a brighter future to Martin County.”

Sixty-two high school students from 45 Kentucky counties graduated this summer from the 2017 Class of Rogers Scholars. The program was held on the campus of Lindsey Wilson College in South Central Kentucky in Adair County.

“We have had another incredible summer for the Rogers Scholars program,” said Laura Glover, Managing Director of Operations at The Center. “We’ve had students from all over Southern and Eastern Kentucky gather together to learn and grow with the program. This is an extremely intelligent and dedicated group of young individuals. We look forward to seeing what is in store for them in the future.”

Horn is the daughter of John Horn of Inez and the late Tracy Horn.

Since the program began, 1,182 high school students have graduated from Rogers Scholars, and potential scholarships valued at more than $7.2 million have been offered to graduates from 17 participating colleges and universities.

For more information about the Rogers Scholars program, call 606-677-6000 or visit www.centeryouthprograms.com.

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Established in 1996 through the vision of U.S. Congressman Harold "Hal" Rogers, (KY-05), and other leaders, The Center for Rural Development is a nonprofit organization fueled by a mission to provide leadership that stimulates innovative and sustainable economic development solutions and a better way of life in Southern and Eastern Kentucky. In its 45-county primary service region, The Center provides innovative programs in leadership, public safety, technology, and arts and culture. The Center is committed to constantly expanding its capabilities in order to deliver a range of key services throughout Kentucky and the nation.