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UPDATE: (FRIDAY MORNING) FLETCHER LAUDS DRIVER

LAWRENCE CO. SCHOOLS SUPT. DR. ROB FLETCHER OFFERED THE FOLLOWING STATEMENT THIS MORNING CONCERNING THE BUS ACCIDENT THIS WEEK.

Larry Whitt drew praise from Supt. Fletcher  after quick thhking on his bus route.Larry Whitt drew praise from Supt. Fletcher after quick thhking on his bus route."...Yesterday evening, one of our bus drivers, Mr. Larry Whitt, made some quick decisions that helped keep our students out of harm's way.

While driving his evening bus run, Mr. Whitt met a tractor trailer in a curve on Rt. 1690. Mr. Whitt pulled the bus to the side of the road, putting a tire in the ditch line, in order to avoid a major collision. The tractor trailer grazed the back end of the bus, but Mr. Whitt's actions avoided a major collision, and more importantly, kept our students from being injured.

We are very thankful to Mr. Whitt, and to all our bus drivers, that take care of our kids on a daily basis. I also appreciate Personnel Director, Mr. Vernon Hall, and Transportation Director, Mr. Rick Blackburn as well as the law enforcement and emergency management personnel that took care of our students during the incident yesterday."


All In,

Robbie L. Fletcher, EdD
Superintendent, Lawrence County Schools

EYEWITNESS REPORTS STATE THAT BUS WRECK CAME 'VERY CLOSE' TO BEING 'MUCH WORSE' AS NEAR HEAD-ON COLLISION WITH TRACTOR TRAILER AVOIDED BY LAST SECOND ACTION BY SCHOOL BUS DRIVER

a Lawrence County school bus and a tractor-trailer scraped back ends on state Route 1690, about one mile from the exit onto Route 645 not far from the Lawrence/Martin County border lines.a Lawrence County school bus and a tractor-trailer scraped back ends on state Route 1690, about one mile from the exit onto Route 645 not far from the Lawrence/Martin County border lines.

FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - written by WADE QUEEN


For the second time in just over a week, there was a crash involving a school bus in Lawrence County.

According to the Lawrence County Emergency Management Agency, On Wednesday afternoon, February 15, just shortly after 4 P.M. Lawrence County E-911 received a call that a Lawrence County school bus and a tractor-trailer scraped back ends on state Route 1690, about one mile from the exit onto Route 645 not far from the Lawrence/Martin County border lines.

Lawrence County E-911 immediately dispatched the Lawrence County Sheriff's Department, Cherryville Fire Department, Netcare Ambulance, and the Lowmansville Fire Department. All these emergency agencies responded quickly to the crash scene.

Once all the emergency agencies arrived, they discovered that both the school bus and the tractor-trailer had collided their rear ends of both vehicles, receiving minor damages, and that after the scraping collision, the Lawrence County school bus ended up in a roadside ditch.

After EMS checked out everyone on the school bus and tractor trailer driver, it was determined no one was hurt in the wreck.

Parents of some of the students picked up their kids from the crash scene, and the rest of the children from the ditched bus were transferred to another school bus.

According to several of the students who were on the school bus, they stated to emergency officials and also to their parents that the tractor trailer came around the corner of the road at a high speed, and that the tractor trailer was on the bus's side of the road.

The students all then said that had it not been for the extremely quick actions of the bus driver in the last second or two, the school would have definitely been hit in a head on collision with the tractor trailer, a fate that was avoided when the school bus driver swerved away from the oncoming big rig vehicle.  No injuries occurred as well in what could have been a catastrophic tragedy for our local region was averted.

The other Lawrence school bus accident happened just last week on February 7. In that accident, a Lawrence County school bus also had a scraping collision with a vehicle, a SUV, just before 3:30 P.M., on Old Lick Creek Road, just below Lawrence County High School. In that accident, three people in the SUV and one student on the school bus received minor injuries, after initially emergency officials reported that were no injuries in that first accident. The February 7 bus wreck collision remains under investigation by the Louisa Police Department, and also the Lawrence County School Board.

The Lawrence County Sheriff's Department is conducting the investigation into the latest February 15 bus crash, as well as the Lawrence County School Board is also.

Larry Whitt averted potential crash as a lawrence Bus DriverLarry Whitt averted potential crash as a lawrence Bus Driver

 

 

 

 Wilson has 'vision' for Lawrence students

Neil Wilson said  'The Susan Wilson Memorial Scholarship Fund' is named for Wilson’s late wife Susan M. Wilson who passed away in June 2016.Neil Wilson said 'The Susan Wilson Memorial Scholarship Fund' is named for Wilson’s late wife Susan M. Wilson who passed away in June 2016.“My vision is to have enough people contribute to a scholarship so that every graduating student in this county would be able to go to college,” said Louisa resident Neil Wilson. “I believe our generation has no greater obligation than to help students reach their potential,”

This is the reason he has established a scholarship to help graduating Lawrence County High School students attend ACTC.
The Susan Wilson Memorial Scholarship Fund is named for Wilson’s late wife Susan M. Wilson who passed away in June 2016.

“Susan and I always valued education very highly, and I think sometimes our students who are getting ready to graduate just need an extra bit of encouragement to go on to college,” Wilson said. “When I council students, I always tell them there are three things that will bring them success. These are education, education and education.”

A retired American Electric Power engineer, Wilson and his wife came to Louisa in 1973 when he accepted a position at Kentucky Power Company’s Big Sandy Plant. He worked there for 37 years while his wife worked for a number of coal companies and an accounting firm.

“Each of us greatly appreciated the education that we received and that allowed us to live a fulfilling life,” he said. “We both graduated from West Virginia Tech in Montgomery, WV. My wife’s degree was in Secretarial Studies and my degree was in Electrical Engineering. I went on to become a licensed professional engineer and received an MBA from Morehead State University.”

“We felt that education was important to us and was important for others.” Wilson’s support of education has included working with Lawrence County school students in functions such as Project Lead the Way and science fairs.

“I have been privileged to help in the school system when anything would become available. We have a great school system in the county, and sometimes students need a push to realize their full potential as college students,” Wilson said.

He has also supported ACTC as a judge in the recent ACTC/FIVCO Science Fair and as an advisor for ACTC’s Applied Process Technology Program.

“ACTC is a perfect choice for students who have not committed to another college,” he said. “ACTC is local so they have the experience of studying on the college level while still be able to live at home. The college has very reasonable tuition and fees, and students can look at a variety of programs they might not have considered before.”

Wilson’s passion for education was translated into scholarship support when he talked with a young person who was going to ACTC. “My first thought was great, but how could I help? The idea occurred that since I could not help with the classes, I could at least pay for tuition and fees. So I did that anonymously, and I felt so good about it I decided to set up a scholarship to help other students.”

“I initially contributed $10,000 on a Friday, and I did not sleep well that weekend. I think God was telling me I could do better than that, so I went back the next Monday and contributed another $10,000. Sure enough, I sleep better now,” he said.

Wilson hopes that other people will follow his example in supporting scholarships. “The scholarship fund is a memorial to Susan and a way to help young people in her name,” he said.” If people who know me see my name attached to a scholarship, I hope they will say, ‘if that tight wad can set this up, we can contribute too.’”

The Susan Wilson scholarship is for Lawrence County High School graduates with a 2.5 or higher GPA. April 1 is the priority deadline for to apply for a fall 2017 scholarship. When applying for a scholarship, students also need to fill out an ACTC application and the FAFSA.

For more scholarship information, visit ashland.kctcs.edu and click on Costs and Financial Aid. For details on establishing scholarships, contact ACTC Director of Advancement Brooke Seasor at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 606-326-2092.


Gayle Fritz
PR Coordinator
Ashland Community and Technical College
606.326.2134
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

R&R Trucking Four employees from Joplin, Mo.-based R&R Trucking completed CDL training on the Hager Hill campus on Big Sandy Community and Technical College on Friday, February 10.  Shown are: Dayna Dunn, Kenneth Thompson, Charles Wilson and Shawn Thompson.  R&R Trucking Four employees from Joplin, Mo.-based R&R Trucking completed CDL training on the Hager Hill campus on Big Sandy Community and Technical College on Friday, February 10. Shown are: Dayna Dunn, Kenneth Thompson, Charles Wilson and Shawn Thompson.

HAGER HILL, Ky. – When officials from R&R Trucking was looking for quality commercial driver’s license (CDL) training, they looked long and far.

And they landed 733 miles away on the Hager Hill campus of Big Sandy Community and Technical College (BSCTC).

Joplin, Mo-based R&R Trucking sent four drivers (Dayna Dunn, Kenneth Thompson, Charles Wilson and Shawn Thompson) to be trained at BSCTC’s acclaimed CDL program.

The drivers completed the program on Friday, February 10 and are ready to hit the road.

“This program was wonderful,” said Dunn. “This gave us the opportunity to learn driving in all kinds of conditions because of the terrain here.”

She jokingly added: “I also learned what a holler is.”

The group of drivers bragged on the quality of instruction they received. They especially noted the personal attention given during the training. Leo Fell was the lead instructor and Johnny Ward, Bryan Conley and Roger Wallen assisted Fell.

“Our CDL program is a leader in not only in instruction but also curriculum development,” said Kelli Hall, dean of career education and workforce development. The college has partnered with the Kentucky Trucking Association to help streamline quality curriculum to providers across the state. “We’re proud to partner with R&R, and we are confident that our program will create quality drivers for their business.”

To learn more about BSCTC’s CDL program, contact Leo Fell at (606) 788-2923 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..