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TheLevisaLazer.com - Education

December 19, 2014;

Cafeteria Program Wins 2nd Place in State Recognition; Board Recognizes Roberts’ Service... 
 

Celebrating the years that Madaline Roberts had served on the School Board. She will be replaced by former LC teacher J.D. Goble in January 2015. Lazer photo by Elizaneth MooreCelebrating the years that Madaline Roberts had served on the School Board. She will be replaced by former LC teacher J.D. Goble in January 2015. Lazer photo by Elizaneth Moore

LOUISA – Lawrence County’s Kentucky Youth Assembly delegation, which won awards for top bill and outstanding speaker, presented their achievements at the December Board of Education meeting, five Lawrence County Schools got contributions from the Louisa Food City Store and the Board of Education and the audience bid an appreciative farewell to longtime member Maddlene Roberts.

LCHS students that had received Outstanding Legislative Bill Award at Kentucky Youth Assembly: Nicholas Kessinger, Conner May, Alan Lin, Brayden West, Outstanding Speakers Sydney Kinev and Cedric JudeLCHS students that had received Outstanding Legislative Bill Award at Kentucky Youth Assembly: Nicholas Kessinger, Conner May, Alan Lin, Brayden West, Outstanding Speakers Sydney Kinev and Cedric JudeThe KYA delegates present: Cedric Jude, Nicholas Kessinger, Brayden West, Alan Lin and Sydney Kinev updated the Board on their impressive showing at the 2014 KYA – which included the passage of a bill written by Connor May, Kessinger, West and Lin and lobbied for by Jude, and Kinev’s selection as one of the event’s outstanding speakers.

Cheryl Gowan and Kevin Garrett, Food City’s Human Relations Coordinator and Store Manager, presented checks totaling $2,111.74 to Lawrence County High School, Blaine School, Louisa Elementary East and Louisa Elementary West for School Bucks received as a result of customer participation in the program. Gowan stressed the availability of much more in the way of rewards emphasized that the program begins in August of each year and customers must sign up every year in order to participate.

Cheryl Gowan, Food City Human Relations Coordinator and rKevin Garrett, Food City’s Louisa Store manager presented the School Bucks to Lawrence County Supt. Dr. Robbie Fletcher.Cheryl Gowan, Food City Human Relations Coordinator and rKevin Garrett, Food City’s Louisa Store manager presented the School Bucks to Lawrence County Supt. Dr. Robbie Fletcher.

Roberts was honored for her eight years of service as a Board of Education member and she remarked that it had been “a pleasure to serve the community and students and staff of Lawrence County.”

She was presented with a plaque and enthusiastically applauded for her tenure of service.

Lawrence County Food Service Director Cindy Hay, along with Maggie McClanahan and Brenda McGinnis, informed the board of the selection of the “Breakfast On The Go” program as the state’s second place initiative designed to boost breakfast participation numbers.

Cindy Queen, Teacher of Blind and Visually Impaired was congratulated for receiving National Board CertificationCindy Queen, Teacher of Blind and Visually Impaired was congratulated for receiving National Board CertificationThe program allows students who might have missed the first attempt at breakfast to grab something appealing and nutritious one the way to class and was honored for its success.LCHS senior engineering student Ashleigh Adkins described the class project designed and constructed by Brad West’s students. It is a sculpture constructed of cans of food collected in the food drive held by the Lawrence County Youth Services Center.

It stands in the library and is in the form of an open book with pages dedicated to different subjects, including one with the popular slogan, “All in LC,” which frequently appears as hashtag on Twitter and Facebook.

Also, Lawrence County Schools instructor Cindy Queen was honored for her achievement on National Board Certification as a teacher. She is an instructor of the blind and visually impaired students of Lawrence County.

See pics of two recent MSU grads from Louisa on Snapshots page HERE

 

Superintendent's personnel actions

 

Hiring

Leneda Rice - Part-Time Credit Recovery Teacher (45-days) and Part-Time

IDEA Achievement Test Trainer (6-days)

Leslie Boyer - Cook/Baker (4.5 hrs/day) at Louisa Middle School

Pam Blevins - Cook/Baker (4.5 hrs/day) at Louisa East Elementary School



Substitute Teachers

Connie Maynard

Wade Skaggs

Larisa Gauze

 

Substitute Instructional Assistant

Donnie Shapaka

 

Substitute Bus Driver

Ricky Caudill

 

Substitute Bus Monitor

Tonya Ferguson

 

Substitute Cook/Baker

Avenell Moore

 

Change of Position

Heather Gauze - From Instructional Assistant (1-Year) at Louisa West

Elementary School to Teacher (1-Year) at Louisa West Elementary School

Brettia Hammond - From District Food Service: Manager at Louisa West

Elementary School to District Food Service: Account Clerk II

 

Resignation

Robert Kitchen - Custodian at Fallsburg Elementary School (effective January 31, 2015)

Lawrence County Board of Education Regular Meeting

Every Child College and Career Ready; A Community Involved and Informed

December 15, 2014 6:00 p.m.

Lawrence County High School

Louisa, Kentucky

 

 

AGENDA

1. CALL TO ORDER

Mission: Every Child College and Career Ready; A Community Involved and Informed

The Pledge to the United States Flag

2. APPROVE AGENDA

3. STUDENT/STAFF PRESENTATIONS/RECOGNITIONS

3.A. Presentation of School Bucks for Lawrence County Schools: Cheryl Gowan, Food City Human Relations Coordinator

3.B. LCHS Students Receive Outstanding Legislative Bill Award at Kentucky Youth Assembly (KYA): Nicholas Kessinger, Conner May, Alan Lin, Brayden West; Outstanding Speaker: Sydney Kinev

3.C. LCHS Engineering Project: Design, Build, Share & Project Presentation by Ashleigh Adkins

3.D. Congratulations on National Board Certification: Cindy Queen, Teacher of Blind and Visually Impaired

3.E. LCHS Cafeteria: 2nd Place in State Breakfast Challenge to Increase Participation, Maggie McClanahan, Manager; Cindy Hay, LC Food Service Director

4. COMMUNICATION

4.A. Superintendent's Update

4.A.1. Common assessment work – Lead from Mrs. Webb & District Resource Team

4.A.2. A “Thank You” on behalf of Ms. Jessica Keeton and the LCHS Choir Students for the MSU Choral Festival

4.A.3. Strategic Planning Team Process (Big Rock)

4.A.4. KSBA, KASS, and KASA-Cohort 3 conferences and trainings

4.A.5. Evidence Based Funding Matrix – Adequacy for Excellence Report Synopsis

4.A.6. Mid-year reviews for PPGES (Principals)

4.A.7. Request the BOE to complete a mid-year review for Superintendent Fletcher​

4.B. Ad Hoc/Planning for Progress Committee

4.B.1. Final Report

4.B.2. Charge Completed/Committee Dissolved

4.C. LC Board of Education Standing Committees

4.D. Public Comment

5. STUDENT LEARNING AND SUPPORT SERVICES

5.A. Approve Minutes of the November 17, 2014 Board Meeting

5.B. Approve the Monthly Financial Report – Edris Humphrey, Finance Director

5.B.1. Bank Reconciliation Report

5.B.2. MUNIS Balance Sheet and Monthly Financial Report

5.B.3. Finance Update: Budget Process

5.C. Approve the Claims and Orders of the Treasurer

CONSENT AGENDA

5.D. Approve Consent Agenda items:

5.D.1. Per diem and expenses for members present

5.D.2. Contracts:

5.D.2.a. Lawrence County Schools with Ginger Fyffe for speech therapy services for students with disabilities

5.D.3. Requests:

5.D.3.a. Fundraisers:

5.D.3.a.1. Lawrence County High School

5.D.3.a.2. Louisa Middle School

5.D.3.b. Trip Requests:

5.D.3.b.1. Annual Fallsburg 8th Grade Trip; out of state travel to Williamsburg, Virginia; April 20-April 24, 2015; Kim Hatfield, Del Shepherd, Benji Adkins

5.D.3.b.2. Students to Kentucky United Nations Association (KUNA); Louisville, KY; March 8-10, 2015, Pam Puryear

5.D.4. For Review:

5.D.4.a. School Activity Fund Reports – October (eMeeting)

5.D.4.b. SBDM/Advisory Council Minutes (BES)

5.D.4.c. D-C Elevator Company Annual Price Adjustment

5.E. Approve to accept the 2013-2014 Annual Financial Auditor Reports of independent auditor Dan Howard, P.S.C., Certified Public Accountant

5.F. Approve to accept the 2013-2014 Lawrence County School District Audited Annual Financial Report (AFR) - July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014

5.G. Approve Revised 2014-2015 District Improvement Plan and District Assurances

5.H. Approve review and acceptance of Revised 2014-2015 School Improvement Plans for Blaine Elementary, Fallsburg Elementary, Louisa East Elementary, Louisa West Elementary, Louisa Middle and Lawrence County High School

5.I. Approve Honeywell Building Solutions Service Agreements

5.J. Approve 2015-2016 Nonresident Pupil Contract with Boyd County

5.K. Approve to accept lone bid for snow removal

5.L. Approve to enter Executive Session for the purpose discussion of student discipline pursuant to KRS 61.810(1)(f)

5.M. Approve return to Open Session

5.N. New Business

6. PERSONNEL

6.A. Approve creation regarding position(s) for 2014-2015

6.B. Superintendent Professional Growth and Evaluation System (SPGES)

6.B.1. Update to July Orientation to Evaluation: Procedure 2.14 AP.2 (Review/Revised: 9/15/14): Chairman Jim See

6.B.2. Monthly Update Dr. Robbie Fletcher, Superintendent: Standard 7 Influential Leadership

6.B.3. Mid-year review requested by Dr. Fletcher

6.C. Superintendent's Personnel Action/Update

7.  ADJOURN

 

ACTC Diesel Technology Offers Many Options...

First year Diesel Technology students at ACTC received Biodiesel Technician Training certificates from the Kentucky Soybean Board on November 20. “I think it is appropriate for students to know about alternative fuels that are sustainable and renewable,” said Professor McCarty, shown at far right.First year Diesel Technology students at ACTC received Biodiesel Technician Training certificates from the Kentucky Soybean Board on November 20. “I think it is appropriate for students to know about alternative fuels that are sustainable and renewable,” said Professor McCarty, shown at far right.

The increased use of diesel engines in light to heavy trucks, automobiles and farm equipment is constantly increasing the need for qualified repair and maintenance specialists.  Job openings for bus /truck mechanics and diesel engine specialists are expected to grow 13 percent a year according to the Kentucky Occupational Employment Outlook to 2020.

Students in the Diesel Technology Program at Ashland Community and Technical College are learning to become the specialists who can fill those jobs.

Logan W. Fannin is working on her first career. A 2013 high school graduate from Roanoke, VA, she moved in with her grandmother in Huntington in order to come to ACTC.  “I’ve always loved getting my hands dirty and learning how things work. My mother was a diesel mechanic and a welder, so I was open to the idea of that kind of job.”

“The people here have been a huge plus,” Fannin said.” I thought I might be treated differently as a girl, but that’s not the case at all. The hands-on- learning here helps a lot, and having a good instructor who’s willing to work with you at any pace has made all the difference.  I’ve always struggled with books, but here I’m not embarrassed to ask for help.”

Dana A. Lewis from Ironton is working on a second career.  He took diesel courses in high school but then worked as a chemical operator for 21 years until his job shut down. He went back to diesel “because it’s a good field that has job openings, and there are good paying opportunities in the area.”

“It’s a little challenging to go back to school after all this time but when you put your mind to it, anything is possible,” Lewis said.  He wants to become a medium/heavy duty truck mechanic for a stable new career. “It’s an excellent program here, and every certificate you can get is another step up to a more secure future.”

The Diesel Technology program is multifaceted, reflecting the different types of diesel vehicles and the many skills needed to keep those vehicles running. Diesel mechanics handle everything from vehicle brakes or steering to major engine repairs, and diesel maintenance is becoming more complex as more electronic components are used.

“We teach all of the operating systems of trucks and heavy equipment,” said Shannon R. McCarty, Associate Professor and Diesel Technology Program Coordinator. “Students learn to handle the most common service and repair skills they will face on the job.”

Three diplomas are available: Construction Equipment Technician, Agriculture Equipment Technician, and Medium and Heavy Truck Technician.  Students may apply their diploma credits to an Associate in Applied Science Degree in General Occupational / Technical Studies.

Twelve certificates are also offered to provide specific repair and maintenance skills on different types of vehicles and systems.

Classes are taught by McCarty and Professor Richard Burnett, and both are ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) Certified Master Medium/Heavy Duty Truck technicians. Burnett is also Chair of the Manufacturing, Transportation & Industrial Technology Division.

“I enjoy diesel equipment maintenance and repair, and I like the opportunity to share the skills I’ve acquired with others,” McCarty said. He had nearly 18 years of experience in diesel and gasoline vehicle maintenance and repair before starting at ACTC in 2007.  He has been nominated by his students for an ACTC Teaching Excellence Award, for several years.

Diesel Technology Jobs Are Available

“We have been very fortunate in finding employment for graduates, and employers often call me when looking for potential employees,” McCarty said.

Area employers include Whayne Supply, Power Products, Flagship, CSX, Bridgeport Equipment, Heritage Equipment, Stein Inc., Greenup County Bus Garage, Marathon Transportation. Stafford Drilling  and Worldwide Equipment.

The variety of employers demonstrates the many uses of skills learned in the program, from trucking companies, equipment repair shops, construction, rental, and locomotive repair shops to bus companies, mining companies, state highway departments and industrial plants.

ACTC Christmas Tree contest for faculty, staff and students, was won by this tree by the Cosmetology Program.ACTC Christmas Tree contest for faculty, staff and students, was won by this tree by the Cosmetology Program.A diesel mechanic may specialize in engine rebuilding, transmission repair, or tune-ups. Experienced mechanics with leadership qualities soon find their way into supervisory positions.  Graduates may qualify for other related jobs in the manufacturing and sales of diesel equipment, and some will eventually go into business for themselves, operating diesel service or repair shops

“I’ve found that ACTC diesel graduates are ready to go into our apprenticeships,” said Tony Barnett, Service Manager at Whayne Supply’s Ashland Branch. “We had at least 10 employees from ACTC over the years, and I haven’t had one who couldn’t do the job.”

“ACTC is a good resource for businesses,” Barnett said.  “I want people who are ready to learn our jobs. I know the diesel instructors are really making sure the students have learned all the needed skills and that they have a positive attitude about work.”

“ACTC gives the students a good foundation for starting in the field,” Barnett added.  “I think people need college for whatever they want to be and wherever they want to go, and diesel is no exception.  I like it when students finish a degree. It’s something to be proud of and gives the students a background that can help them go in several different directions.”

Barnett is a member of the advisory board that help the diesel program stay up to date with employer needs.  “Advisory board members often hire our students, and this helps them see firsthand what we are teaching and what we could do to make our program better,” McCarty said.

“Employers often mention the need to find dependable workers, so we put an emphasis on being dependable, which includes showing up for work each day and on time, as well as solid mastery of diesel skills,” said McCarty.

ACTC’s Diesel Technology Program is certified by NATEF (National Automotive Technicians Educational Foundation) /ASE. For more information on the program, contact McCarty at 606-326-2473 or email: shannon.mccarty@kctcs.edu.

Tuition Scholarships for Childcare Workers

Free tuition will be available next summer to childcare workers who want to earn credentials in ACTC’s Interdisciplinary Early Childhood Education (IECE) Program.  The Kentucky's KIDS NOW scholarship is designed to help working childcare employees earn IECE certificates, the associate degree and even a transfer bachelor's degree.

The only requirement for the scholarship is to be working at least 20 hours a week in an early childhood program or classroom that has state funding. All state-run preschool classrooms qualify, as well as any blended Head Start Programs. This includes dozens of childcare and daycare programs in the FIVCO area.

Scholarship students may take up to nine hours in a semester, with a total of $1,800 in tuition available per student each year.  The IECE program offers five certificates as well as a diploma and an Associate of Applied Science Degree.  Many of the IECE courses and the general education courses required for a diploma or degree are offered online.

Anyone interested in pursuing IECE credentials and/or a degree at ACTC can email Robin Johns, IECE Program Coordinator, at rjohns0006@kctcs.edu. For scholarship information, you may also contact Scholarship Liaison Jenny Kiser at jenny.kiser@uky.edu.

Apply Now for Spring Classes

Applications for 2015 spring classes at ACTC will be accepted through December 29.  Admission information and applications are available at ashland.kctcs.edu, and applications may be submitted online.

For students whose files are complete and who have no holds on their records, enrollment is ongoing through December 19 and will resume January 5. Classes begin January 12.

Financial aid is available for students who qualify. The “Free Application for Federal Student Aid” (FAFSA), the only form required for most federal and state aid programs, can be submitted electronically through the web at fafsa.gov. For financial aid questions, call 855.246.2282.

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